The Best MIDI Keyboard Controllers - All Prices

The Highest Rated MIDI Keyboards

Disclosure

We recommend all products independently of 3rd parties including advertisers. We earn advertising fees from:
• • • • •
Sweetwater
• • • • •

Amazon

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
• • • • •

MIDI controllers used to be a niche market; the few that make them only had a few models to choose from back then. These days, the entire price range from budget to high-end has been filled out with great products. The challenge now is choosing the best one to fit both your budget and your needs.

With extensive research into various MIDI Keyboard Controllers, we have come up with a list of the best on the market today.

For this 2020 update, we decided to include MIDI controllers upwards of $1000 as there have been more products released in that price range such as the Roli Seaboard RISE 49.

The Best MIDI Keyboards

Best MIDI Keyboard Controllers Under $200

Midiplus AK490 - 49 Keys

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 70+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$60
midiplus AK490 49-Key MIDI Keyboard Controller

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller Under $200 along with the Arturia MiniLab MkII.

Taiwanese manufacturer Midiplus has surprised the synth community with the AK490.

Featuring a 5-pin DIN MIDI out, the AK490 can be used to control older analog synths in addition to being used with a computer using its USB MIDI connection.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 49 Velocity Sensitive, Synth Action keys
  • Pads: None
  • Controls: Pitch, Mod, Octave
  • Octave: 4 Octaves (+/-)
  • Zones: None
  • Automap: unspecified
  • Connectivity: 1 x USB Type B, 1 x 5-pin MIDI out, 1 x Sustain Pedal Input
  • Control Hardware Directly: Yes
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.7 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Dimensions: 14" x 8.7" x 2"
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, UVI Grand Piano, Analog Lab Lite

Pros
MIDI controllers at this price range tend to be in the more modern leaning with just MIDI via USB. The Midiplus AK490 gets praise from analog synth users for its 5-pin DIN MIDI Out. This enables them to control analog gear aside from virtual instruments.

Cons
Key action isn't the best with some describing it as a bit 'mushy'.

Overall
If you want an affordable MIDI Controller for both your software and hardware, the Midiplus AK490 is an accessible pick.

Arturia MiniLab MkII with 25 Slim Keys

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 650+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$109
Arturia MiniLab MkII

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller Under $200 along with the Midiplus AK490.

The Arturia Minilab MKII is a compact USB MIDI controller with an impressive array of controls, specifically designed to meet the needs of electronic musicians.

What separates it from the pack is its 16 encoders, which allow for realtime controls over filters and other parameters, and add to that its built-in RGB lit pads, which expands your control options even further.

Instead of using mechanical wheels, Arturia implemented two touch strips for controlling pitch and modulation, adding to the unit's futuristic appeal.

All of these extras add to its 25 synth action slim size keys, which wraps up its instrument functions.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 25 Slim Synth Action Keys
  • Pads: 8 RGB Pads
  • Controls: 16 Encoders, Octave, Pitchbend, Mod Touch Strips
  • Octave: 4 Octaves (+/-)
  • Zones: 1
  • Automap: Yes (On some DAW Software)
  • Connectivity: USB
  • Control Hardware Directly: No
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.7 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Dimensions: 14" x 8.7" x 2"
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, UVI Grand Piano, Analog Lab Lite

Pros
From its stylish appeal, to the feel of its keys, and even on to its robust build, response to the Arturia MiniLab MKII continues to be highly positive. Music Radar confirms what most users say by describing it this way: "Amazing build quality, great keyboard". The quality of the bundled software also got a lot of commendations. And while this keyboard is meant for electronic musicians, even those who are into other musical styles chipped in with their good feedback.

Cons
There are a few who felt that the bundled software is a bit lacking, especially when compared to the previous version, but they are very happy with the improvements on the hardware.

Overall
If you're looking for a compact yet versatile MIDI controller, then the Arturia MiniLab MkII, with its extensive control options, is highly recommended.

Best MIDI Keyboard Controllers Under $500

Arturia KeyLab 49 mkII - 49 Keys

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 30+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$449
Arturia KeyLab 49 mkII 49-Key MIDI Keyboard Controller

The KeyLab 49 has a few things in common with Arturia’s flagship MatrixBrute synth; namely the latter's velocity sensitive aftertouch keybed.

With 9 faders, 9 encoders, 4 CV outputs, 5 expression control inputs, including great bundled software, the Keylab 49mkII is nothing short of feature-packed. All housed in a sturdy aluminum body.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 49 semi-weighted, velocity sensitive with aftertouch.
  • Pads: 16 x Back-lit RGB Performance Pads
  • Controls: 16 Encoders, Octave, Pitchbend, Mod Touch Strips
  • Automap: Yes (On some DAW Software)
  • Connectivity: USB, 1 x 1/4" (sustain), 1 x 1/4" (expression), 3 x 1/4" (aux), MIDI In/Out/USB, 1 x 1/8" (CV in), 4 x 1/8" (CV out, Gate out, Mod 1, Mod 2)
  • Control Hardware Directly: Yes
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.7 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Dimensions:31.2" " x 11.7" " x 2.1"
  • Weight: 13.8 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, UVI Grand Piano, Analog Lab Lite

Pros
The KeyLab 49 mkII earns much of its praise for the well engineered keybed. While trickled down from Arturia's upper echelon offerings, it doesn't compromise anything. The sturdy housing also makes it well-built for touring.

Cons
The LCD screen could be larger to show more information, but this concern only appeared once in the multitude of reviews.

Overall
With its excellent keybed as the star, the KeyLab 49 is sure to satisfy the most sensitive of touches; a feat in itself for a MIDI Controller.

Arturia KeyLab 61 mkII - 61 Keys

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 100+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$499
Arturia KeyLab mkII 61

At publication time this was the Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller from $200 to $500.

The Keylab 61 mkII builds on the Keylab 49 not just by adding more keys, but making them semi-weighted.

9 encoders and 9 faders round out the assignable controls.

It also has a good amount of inputs, outputs and control.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 61 Semi-weighted keys
  • Pads: 16 x Back-lit RGB Performance Pads
  • Controls: 9 Encoders, 9 Faders, Octave, Pitchbend, Transport Controls
  • Octave: 3 Octaves (+/-)
  • Automap: Yes (On select DAWs)
  • Connectivity: USB, 1 x 1/8" (CV in), 4 x 1/8" (CV out, Gate out, Mod 1, Mod 2), 1 x 1/4" (sustain), 1 x 1/4" (expression), 3 x 1/4" (aux)
  • Control Hardware Directly: Yes
  • Compatibility: OS X 10.10 or later , Windows 7 SP1 or later.
  • Power: 9V DC power supply (sold separately)
  • Dimensions: 34.5" x 11.7" " x 2.1"
  • Weight: 15.4 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Analog Lab 3, Ableton Live Lite, Piano V2, Arturia MIDI Control Center

Pros
Those who purchased the Keylab 61 mkII over the Keylab 49 mkII say that it was the semi-weighted keys that drew them in. The additional range, excellent feel and control possibilities were what users pointed out to be great positives.

Cons
Awkward mod wheel/pitch placement threw off some users. Some felt it needed an arpeggiator and a sequencer.

Overall
If you're looking for a good 61 key MIDI Keyboard Controller with semi-weighted keys, The KeyLab 61 mkII is one of your best bets.

Nektar Panorama P4 - 49 Keys

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$500
Nektar Panorama P4 49-key MIDI Controller Keyboard

With special emphasis on its deep integration and automap compatibility with popular DAWs like Cubase, Reason, Logic Pro, Nuendo, Bitwig Studio and Reaper, the Nektar Panorama P4 is specially designed for studio work.

As a keyboard controller, it comes with 49 full-size keys, all of which feature Aftertouch and are semi-weighted.

But more than that, it houses an extensive array of controls to ensure that you have access to most of the features of your DAW software, this includes 16 encoders, 12 pads, transport controls and more.

With so many things that this keyboard can do, it is nice that it has a colored TFT display, which gives you good visual feedback of your settings.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 49 Full Size Semi-Weighted Keys with Aftertouch
  • Pads: 12
  • Controls: Pitch Bend, Mod Wheel, 16 Encoders, 1 Motorized Fader, Transport Controls,
  • Octave: +4/-3 Octaves
  • Zones: Up to 4
  • Automap: Yes (Bitwig Studio, Cubase, Nuendo, Logic Pro, Reason, Main Stage, and Reaper)
  • Connectivity: MIDI Out, USB
  • Control Hardware Directly: No
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.6 (Up), Windows Vista (Up), iOS
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Dimensions: 33.25" x 13" x 3.25"
  • Weight: 14 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: None

Pros
A good number of users describe the Nektar Panorama P4 as the best MIDI keyboard for Reason, but its not just limited to that because there are also reports of it working nicely with other DAWs, some of the most prominently mentioned include Cubase, Logic Pro and Reaper. A lot of users also love the Panorama P4 for its convenient integration and ease of use. The feel and response of the semi-weighted keys also prompted many users to give this controller high ratings.

Cons
While many appreciate its semi-weighted keybed, there are a few who find the feel to be too stiff, but this is most likely due to them being used to softer synth action keyboards. There are also some who caution that while the automap settings generally work, you'll need to familiarize yourself with the settings, or better yet personalize them to get the most out of the controller.

Overall
If you're using any of the DAWs listed above, and you're looking for a studio friendly MIDI controller then get the Nektar Panorama P4.

Best MIDI Keyboard Controllers Under $1000

Novation 49SL MkIII - 49 Keys

89
GEARANK

89 out of 100. Incorporating 30+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$600
Novation 49SL MkIII 49-Key MIDI Controller Keyboard

With its "everything but the kitchen sink" looks, it may seem like the Novation 49SL might have had one feature too many. But for the musician that absolutely requires control over multiple parameters and tweaking, the Novation 49SL is a treat for the eyes; and the fingers as well.

With the hybrid feel of the synth action keys, tweaked just right to provide resistance similar to semi-weighted keys, the response will feel familiar enough to those transitioning from piano.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 25 Slim Synth Action Keys
  • Pads: 8 RGB Pads
  • Controls: 16 Encoders, Octave, Pitchbend, Mod Touch Strips
  • Octave: 4 Octaves (+/-)
  • Zones: 1
  • Automap: Yes (On some DAW Software)
  • Connectivity: USB
  • Control Hardware Directly: No
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.7 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Dimensions: 14" x 8.7" x 2"
  • Weight: 3.3 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, UVI Grand Piano, Analog Lab Lite

Pros
Users who focus on electronic music production note that the Novation 49SL mkIII is the centerpiece of their creative workflow. The depth of customization is topnotch and the multiple screens provide a great amount of information to further speed up the creative process.

Cons
Flimsy controls may put off some, especially for touring.

Overall
For those who focus entirely on making electronic music and want the cherry on top of their music production studio, the Novation 49SL is a great pick.

Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S61 MK2 - 61 Keys

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 175+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$779
Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S61 MK2

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller from $500 to $1000 along with the Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII.

Native Instruments is well known in DJ circles because for the quality of their Traktor software, they also expanded into music hardware which includes the Komplete Kontrol S61 MK2, a 61-key MIDI keyboard controller.

While it does not have many DJ friendly functions, it does retain the company's standard for quality, as evidenced by its many good ratings.

To achieve its success, NI equipped this controller with a semi-weighted Fatar keybed, and paired it with essential controls that include pitch bend and mod wheels, 8 touch-sensitive knobs, a touch strip and a 4-directional push encoder.

It doesn't have much else in terms of design features, but the keys themselves are more then enough to make it a viable top rated instrument.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 61-Key
  • Pads: Fatar Keybed Semi-Weighted
  • Controls: Pitch Bend Wheel, Mod Wheel, 8 Touch-Sensitive knobs, 4-Directional Push Encoder, Touch Strip
  • Octave: 2 Octaves (+/- )
  • Zones: Up to two (Split)
  • Automap: Yes (Via Software)
  • Connectivity: 5-Pin MIDI, USB
  • Control Hardware Directly: Yes
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.11 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus powered / 15V DC Power Supply (sold separately)
  • Dimensions: 39.6" x 11.7" x 3.3"
  • Weight: 14.4 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Komplete 11 Select Software Bundle

Pros
The Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S61 MKII continues to gather good reviews, most of which are from people who are impressed by the quality of its keyboard . Even those who owned its first iteration found that the MK2 brings with it significant improvements to their overall workflow and performance experience. A good number of users also commended it for the solid feel of the knobs, buttons and keys. And as expected, those who are already using Native Instruments' software are happy with easy it is to integrate into their setup.

Cons
There are some complaints about keyboard mapping not working as they hoped it would. There are also a few who noticed that some of the Fatar keys produce unwanted mechanical noise as they release them.

Overall
If you're using Native Instruments software, or if you're looking for a more streamlined 61-Key MIDI keyboard controller then check this out.

Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII - 88 Keys

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 50+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$899
Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII MIDI Keyboard Controller

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller from $500 to $1000 along with the Native Instruments Komplete Kontrol S61 MK2.

The Arturia KeyLab 88 MKII is a full-size MIDI Controller with 88 Fatar weighted keys.

It also features a complete suite of controls, pads and faders that are all fully assignable to any parameter in your DAW.

Other nifty features include a music sheet/ipad stand and a laptop extension shelf.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 88 hammer action, Weighted Fatar TP/100LR Keybed
  • Pads: 16 x RGB Backlit Performance Pads
  • Controls:9 x Rotary Encoders, 9 x Faders, Pitchbend, Mod Wheel
  • Octave: 2 Octaves (+/-)
  • Automap: Yes
  • Connectivity: 1 x 1/4" (sustain), 1 x 1/4" (expression), 3 x 1/4" (aux pedals), MIDI In/Out/Thru/USB, CV; Pitch out, Gate out, Mod 1, Mod 2, CV in,
  • Control Hardware Directly: Yes
  • Compatibility: OS X 10.11 or later, 64-bit , Windows 7 SP1 or later, 64-bit
  • Power: External AC adapter
  • Dimensions: 50.9" x 12.7" " x 4.4"
  • Weight: 32.4 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Analog Lab Software

Pros:
Glowing reviews are all focused on how good the keys feel to the touch. One reviewer noted that the response feels similar to his Steinberg Grand Piano. A lot of the reviewers they were more than happy with the amount of control they can get with the KeyLab 88.

Cons:
While many found the keys to feel great, others found them to be a bit "spongy", particularly for players used to synth-action keys.

Overall:
If you're accustomed to playing piano and would love to have the same response in a MIDI Controller, the KeyLab 88 is a solid pick and is peerless at this price point.

Best MIDI Keyboard Controllers Over $1000

ROLI Seaboard Rise 49 - 49 Keywaves

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$1200
ROLI Seaboard Rise 49 49-Key MIDI Controller Keyboard

This odd looking MIDI Controller from ROLI forgoes the traditional mechanical synth/weighted action and uses the company's own "keywave" design.

The "keys" are raised portions that are "squishy" to the touch instead of hard keys. Each "keywave" controls both the velocity of the note and modulation depending on where and how you play.

Note Independent glissando is also possible via the channels above each key.

Specifications:

  • Keys:49 Keywaves , velocity sensitive with aftertouch and modulation
  • Pads: None
  • Controls: Assignable Touch Faders, X-Y Touch pad, Octave shift, preset browser
  • Octave: 2 Octaves (+/-)
  • Automap: Yes (On some DAW Software)
  • Connectivity: USB-A port (for charging peripherals), USB-B port (MIDI out and power), Bluetooth
  • Control Hardware Directly: No
  • Compatibility: Mac OSX 10.13+., WWindows 10+.
  • Power: Rechargeable battery / optional 9-12V 2A DC port
  • Dimensions: 32.8" " x 8.3" x 0.9"
  • Weight: 12.13 lbs
  • Bundled Software: Equator software synthesizer

Pros
Users bought the unit to supplement their existing MIDI controllers with some purchasing it out of curiosity. They were delighted to find that the Seaboard Rise 49 opened up new musical possibilities especially with the smooth note transitions and glissando effects. Many of them felt like they had to learn a new instrument because of the added modulation and expression. Despite having an entirely different tactile feel, many users adapted quickly to the keywaves.

Cons
Keywaves not for everyone. Might actually be limiting as a sole MIDI Controller. Some found third-party virtual instruments a pain to set up with the added modulation features.

Overall
If you're looking for new avenues of expression and are open to the idea of learning a new way to play keys, the ROLI Seaboard 49 will reward you with otherworldly new performance possibilities.

Kawai VPC1 Virtual Piano Controller - 88 Keys

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 125+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$1849
Kawai VPC1 Virtual Piano Controller

At publication time this was the Highest Rated MIDI Keyboard Controller across all price ranges.

Piano maker Kawai brings throws a curveball to the MIDI Controller market with the VPC1 Virtual Piano Controller.

Instead of piling on controls, screens and faders, the VPC1 aims to replicate the feel of a true, hammer-action piano, not dissimilar to their acoustic piano offerings.

That forms Kawai's design philosophy for the VPC1: a product designed for the discerning piano player that prefers to use the best virtual piano instruments.

Specifications:

  • Keys: 88 RM3II Wooden-key, Graded-hammer Action with Counterbalancing
  • Pads: None
  • Controls: None
  • Connectivity: USB, MIDI In/Out , 1 x Damper, 1 x Sustain, 1 x Soft (Includes Triple-pedal Unit)
  • Compatibility: OSX 10.7 (Up), Windows 7 SP1 (Up)
  • Power: USB Bus Powered, AC Adaptor
  • Dimensions: 54.33" x 16.75" x 7.33"
  • Weight: 65 lbs.
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, UVI Grand Piano, Analog Lab Lite

Pros
Reviewers love the keys. Positive reviews note everything from the look and feel, the response, the velocity curves and the silent mechanism of the keys. This makes it perfect for studios that want to offer premium piano recordings with virtual instruments while satisfying the performers and allowing them to express themselves. They also liked how the controller can be powered by USB without any external power supply.

Cons
Not portable. 2 Jacks required for the triple floor pedal. May not be the best to control other virtual instruments

Overall
If you own a studio or are a piano player that desires the most realistic feeling Piano format MIDI controller on the market today, look no further than the Kawai VPC1 Virtual Piano Controller.

Things to Consider When Buying a MIDI Keyboard Controller

  • Keybed: Key Size, Weight, Action, Velocity and Aftertouch

    Not all keyboards follow the standard piano size and action because it's not always applicable, especially when considering portability. This is the reason why compact controllers come with slim size keys, which requires some technique adjustment for those who are used to standard size keys.

    Key weight and action refers to how hard you have to press the keys to trigger a sound. Synth action keys have the softest playing feel, while fully weighted (hammer action) ones need a bit more force, similar to an acoustic piano. Others offer something in between, which they call semi-weighted. Velocity sensitivity refers to how the keys respond to the dynamics of your playing or how forcefully you press the keys. While Aftertouch adds effects depending on the pressure you apply as you hold down a note.

    Your choice of size, action and sensitivity will boil down to your budget and preference, which is usually similar to what you are used to playing.

  • Number of Zones

    Zones let you split the keyboard into multiple sections which each transmit on separate MIDI channels. An example of this type of usage is when you have one sound module for bass sounds and another for piano or synth sounds and you split the keyboard so that your left hand plays the bass sounds while your right hand plays the other sounds. These days many MIDI controllers do not have this feature built-in, but DAWs and some plugins will allow you to set virtual zones to your preference. Note that you need this feature on the keyboard to do it when directly controlling hardware without a computer in the loop.

  • Mod Wheels, Pads and other Control inputs

    If you're looking for more control over your notes, you'll want a controller with pitch bend and modulation. Other features like encoders, buttons and faders allow for even more expressive control over parameters in real time, and they can be used to control your DAW software and plugins.

  • Controlling Hardware Directly vs Connecting to Computers

    Most are now using MIDI controllers to trigger virtual instruments in computers, and this is done mostly via USB, but there are some that allow for wireless use via Bluetooth. To trigger other hardware like analog synthesizers, you'll need a controller with a 5-pin MIDI cable connection.

  • Auto-Mapping & Software Integration

    While most MIDI controllers have auto-mapping, they are usually limited to specific software. And since DAWs and plugins can be very different - it will benefit you to get a MIDI controller that is designed to integrate well with your preferred music production software, otherwise you'll have to manually map the keyboard to your software.

  • Transport Controls

    Transport controls allow you to gain control of essential recording and playback controls right on your MIDI keyboard, this usually includes play, record, stop, forward, rewind - much like old tape machines.

  • Motorized Controls

    Some controllers come with motorized knobs and faders, which mechanically move to match the current settings in your DAW. This is a convenient feature to have, but since it requires additional moving parts it adds to the overall weight and bulk of the unit, and will generally add to the cost.

  • Power Supply: USB, Batteries & A/C Adapters

    If you are going for portability, look for MIDI keyboards with built-in rechargeable batteries. If you're going to use the controller on a fixed setup and you want to reduce cable clutter, then go for those that draw power from USB. If you're going for units that draw power from wall warts (AC Adapters), you'll need to ensure that you have enough nearby electrical ports to plug into. Note that if you chose USB power with an iPad then you may need to get an additional powered USB hub due to the iPad's lower power output than standard USB allows for

  • Dimensions & Weight

    Balancing portability and functionality is tricky yet important if you want to be musically productive. If you're going to make music while on the move, you're going to want to sacrifice some features and go for something light and compact. On the flipside, you should go for bigger controllers if you're style of music requires you to play conventional piano style music - these are ideal if they are simply going to stay in your home studio.

Best MIDI Keyboard Controller Selection Methodology

This guide was first published during May 2018 written by Alexander Briones and the latest comprehensive update was published on written by Raphael Pulgar with contributions from Alexander.

Since we have published guides for top rated MIDI keyboards based on their number of keys, we decided to focus on finding the best MIDI keyboard controllers within popular price ranges. To achieve this, we gathered a huge amount data from relevant reviews, ratings and discussions that totaled to over 25,500 sources for 90 MIDI keyboards. The scores were then processed by the Gearank algorithm to produce ratings that we used to rank the controllers within each price bracket. For more information about our methods see How Gearank Works.

Post a Comment or Question

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <b> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.