The Best Keyboard Workstations - Budget & Professional

The Highest Rated Keyboard Workstations

Disclosure

We recommend all products independently of 3rd parties including advertisers. We earn advertising fees from:
• • • • •
Sweetwater
• • • • •

Amazon

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
• • • • •

Keyboard workstations are all-in-one instruments that are equally adept at home recording, music production and live performance.

To achieve this level of versatility, they are packed with features that include multiple instrument sound modules, synthesizers, and effects. And they can also serve as your main studio instrument with features like built-in sequencer, audio/MIDI recording with expanded controls and multiple connectivity options.

Here we feature the best keyboard workstations as of February 2022, divided into three price ranges that cover the needs of everyone from immediate level users, to professionals who compose and produce a wide range of styles of music.

The Best Keyboard Workstations

The Best Keyboard Workstations Under $1000

Roland Juno-DS61

94
GEARANK

94 out of 100. Incorporating 375+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$900
Roland JUNO-DS61 Digital Synthesizer

At publication time this was the Highest Rated Keyboard Workstation Under $1000.

The Roland Juno-DS61 is a compact 61-key synth-action keyboard loaded with lots of features, including over 1000 sounds, patches, sound manipulation and more.

It does all this while retaining a portable lightweight profile that can even run on eight AA batteries.

In addition, Roland outfitted the DS61 with phrase pads for triggering samples, and an 8-track pattern sequencer.

It is also designed to be a mobile studio hub with its audio and MIDI recording capabilities, mic input and built-in effects including vocal Auto Pitch.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 61 Synth-Action Keys
  • Polyphony: 128
  • Sound Engine(s): Juno Engine
  • Controllers: Pitchbend and Modulation Levers
  • Audio Recording: Playback Format: ( bit, kHz, Stereo)
  • Audio Playback: WAV, AIFF, MP3
  • Sequencer: 8-Track/li>
  • Audio Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (Mic), 1 x 1/8" (Aux)
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/R), 1 x 1/4" (Headphones)
  • MIDI: In/Out/USB
  • Other Connections: 1 x 1/4" (Sustain), 1 x 1/4" (Control)
  • USB: USB connector 1x TYPE B
  • Power Supply: AC Adapter DC 12V
  • Dimensions: 3.87" x 39.68" x 11.81"
  • Weight: 11.75 lbs

Pros

Owners describe the Juno-DS61 as a great all-in-one synth, useful for everything from traditional piano style playing to modern EDM style performances. Many are impressed at the sounds it produces, especially its Hammond style voices. Its compact profile and portability also makes it a great choice for musicians who are always on the go.

Cons

There are a few who wish that it had weighted keys, but its synth keys is part of its portable design. Some owners are not too happy with the plastic material used for its chassis.

Overall

If you are looking for a versatile, yet portable synthesizer workstation keyboard, then this is for you.

Casio Privia PX-360

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 40+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$999
Casio Privia PX-360 Digital Piano and Workstation

The Casio Privia-360 is a digital piano with workstation features.

Aside from its built-in 16 MIDI track recorder, it allows you to record audio directly with the use of its Color Touch Interface.

Its built-in Rhythm Editor is useful for creating 10 customized User Rhythms using various accompaniment parts.

Other useful features include the duet mode, which splits the keyboard into two equal ranges for a teacher and student to play side by side, and classroom mode, which sends each side to an individual audio output.

Tech Specs

  • Keys:88 hammer actioned keys
  • Polyphony: 128
  • Sound Engine(s): AiR Sound Source
  • Controllers: Pitchbend
  • Audio Recording: Playback Format: .wav (16bit, 44.1kHz, Stereo)
  • Audio Playback: 100 Playback Format
  • Sequencer: 16 Multi Track + 1 System Track 100 Songs
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x 1/4" Line-in, 1 x 1/8" Stereo Mini
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/MONO, R)
  • MIDI: In/Out/Thru/USB
  • Other Connections: 1 x 1/4" Damper Pedal, 1 x 1/4" Assignable Pedal
  • USB: USB connector 1x TYPE B
  • Power Supply: AC Adapter DC 12V
  • Dimensions: 52.0" x 11.5" x 5.5"
  • Weight: 26.2 lbs

Pros

Even with hammer weighted keys, this keyboard workstation is quite portable, thanks to its lightweight plastic construction. And even with the use of plastic material, there are many who are happy with its durability. Several pianists found the keys to be quite responsive with a nice feel. The workstation features like audio recording and sequencer is straightforward enough for those who are just starting to record at home. Users also appreciate its good sounding pianos, organs, synth patches and percussion.

Cons

One user mentioned that the jacks can be a bit flimsy, though using velcro or tape as compensation can support the cables from not falling off the output.

Overall

This is a basic unit that's ideal for those who are new to workstation keyboards.

Yamaha MOXF6

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 200+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$1000
Yamaha MOXF6 61-key Synthesizer Workstation

The MOXF6 is a 61-key synthesizer workstation that's also MIDI keyboard controller with extensive DAW and VST control.

It features Yamaha's MOTIF XF sound engine that has a collection instrument voices, and expandable flash memory that allows you to add up 1GB of new samples.

Its built-in sequencer provides real-time recording, where you can record your performance while playing, and step recording, which is great for recording precise phrases or passages.

Note that this model is now superseded by the newer Yamaha MODX6, but since this is still available from retailers, we still included it in this 2022 edition.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 61 semi-weighted keys
  • Polyphony: 128
  • Sound Engine(s): AWM2, with Expanded Articulation
  • Controllers: Pitch Bend wheel, Modulation wheel, 8 x Assignable Knob, 1 x [DATA] dial, 2 x Assignable Function buttons
  • Effects: 9 x Reverb, 22 x Chorus, 54 types x 8 parts x Insertion (A, B), 1 x Vocoder (uses both Insertion Effect A and B blocks), 9 x Master Effect, Master EQ (5 bands), Part EQ (3 bands, stereo)
  • Audio Recording: Yes
  • Audio Playback: Up to 4 tracks
  • Sequencer: 16 sequence Tracks
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x Line-in [(L/R)
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x Line-out [L/mono)/(R]
  • MIDI: In/Out/Thru
  • Other Connections: 1 x 1/8" Standard stereo phone jack, 1 x Controller Pedal, 2 x Switch Pedal (Assignable/Sustain)
  • USB: USB to host/to device
  • Power Supply: AC Adaptor 13W
  • Dimensions: 40.5" x 5" x 14"
  • Weight: 15.6 lbs.

Pros

Sound quality wise, general feedback is quite positive. In his MusicRadar review, Dan Goldman mentioned even if there was no virtual analog engine on board, the synths "have a very analogue feel and presence - putting a sawtooth poly patch up against an analogue Alesis Andromeda, it was surprising just how close you could get to the raw tone. So, if you're after warm pads, juicy and cutting leads, deep basses and funky comping patches, the MOXF is hard to beat.". Aside from its variety of clean and natural sounding presets and built-in effects, many reviewers are more than satisfied with its responsive keyboard, flexible sequencer with multiple functions such as adjusting velocities, and it's expandable memory feature that allows them to customize and add their own sounds.

Cons

The user interface seems to be an issue for some users - they mention that it takes a while to figure out the controls, although editing parameters are easy once they get more familiar with them.

Overall

This is a versatile unit ideal for musicians who plan to use multiple layers of sounds when composing.

The Best Keyboard Workstations Between $1000 and $2000

Roland Juno-DS76

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 80+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$1130
Roland JUNO-DS76 76-key Synthesizer Workstation

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Keyboard Workstation from $1000 to $2000 along with the Yamaha MODX8.

The Roland Juno-DS76 retains the portability and synth style keys of the DS series, but with a longer 76-note keybed.

As expected it is bigger and heavier than the smaller DS61, but it does retain a portable design, including the ability to run on batteries (8 x AA). It gives you access to the same voices options, which include a wide selection of instruments from Roland's popular piano and hammond style sounds, to percussion, world instruments and more.

As part of the DS series, it comes with workstation friendly features that include audio and MIDI recording, built-in effects, 8-track sequencer, and mic input.

For EDM style performances, the DS76 comes with 8 phrase pads that you can use to trigger samples that you can setup yourself.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 76 Synth-Action Keys
  • Polyphony: 128
  • Sound Engine(s): Juno Engine
  • Controllers: Pitchbend and Modulation Levers
  • Audio Recording: Playback Format: ( bit, kHz, Stereo)
  • Audio Playback: WAV, AIFF, MP3
  • Sequencer: 8-Track/li>
  • Audio Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (Mic), 1 x 1/8" (Aux)
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/R), 1 x 1/4" (Headphones)
  • MIDI: In/Out/USB
  • Other Connections: 1 x 1/4" (Sustain), 1 x 1/4" (Control)
  • USB: 1x TYPE A (Samples), 1 x Type B (Audio/MIDI)
  • Power Supply: AC Adapter DC 12V
  • Dimensions: 4" x 48.5" x 12.25"
  • Weight: 15.25 lbs

Pros

Versatility is the main strength of the Juno-DS76, owners love that it can do much of what they need both as their core home studio instrument, and as their performance keyboard. It gets kudos for a lot of different uses, including live worship, band gigs, vocal accompaniment, home recording and more. Sound quality also exceeds the expectations of many, including experienced musicians who are pleased with how good it sounds given its portable profile.

Cons

If soft synth-style keys are not your cup of tea, then this is not for you.

Overall

If you're in the market for a portable yet versatile workstation keyboard with great quality sounds, then check out the Roland Juno-DS76.

Yamaha MODX8

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 300+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$2000
Yamaha MODX8 88-Key Synthesizer Workstation Keyboard

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Keyboard Workstation from $1000 to $2000 along with the Roland Juno-DS76.

The MODX8 combines workstation functionality and synthesizer capabilities with Yamaha's 88-note graded hammer action keybed.

This means that you get digital piano like playing feel with all the bells and whistles that help with music production. This includes two sound engines (AWM2 and FM-X) with synthesizer, loads of voicings and presets, high polyphony, built-in VCM (Virtual Circuit Modeling) effects, and extensive connectivity options.

It also features Yamaha's Motion Control that lets you adjust multiple parameters in real time with a single knob.

Finally, it has a pitchbend and modulation wheels, along with assignable faders, knobs and buttons.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 88 Graded Hammer Standard Keys
  • Polyphony: 192 Total (128 Stereo AWM2 and 64 FM-X)
  • Sound Engine(s): AWM2, FM-X
  • Controllers: Pitchbend, Modwheel, Assignable Super Knob, Assignable Faders, Knobs and Buttons
  • Effects: Up to 27 simultaneous effects
  • Audio Recording: Yes via Built-in Audio Interface
  • Audio Playback: Yes via Built-in Audio Interface
  • Sequencer: Via Performance Recorder
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x 1/4"
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4"
  • MIDI Inputs/Outputs: In/Out/USB
  • Other Connections: 1 x 1/4" Headphones, 4 x 1/4" Sustain & Foot Controller
  • USB: 1 x Type B, 1 x Type A
  • Dimensions: 6.29” x 52.48” x 15.9”
  • Weight: 30.7 lbs.

Pros

The feel of its graded hammer action keys gets a lot of thumbs up, to the point that some consider this as a versatile digital piano. And speaking of piano, the MODX8 carries some great piano sounds which work very well with its expressive keybed, and this is reflected in reviews. Users describe it as a high quality performance grade instrument in terms of sound, build and versatility. Dan Goldman of Music Radar agrees with market sentiment stating: "it’s hard not to gas for the MODX, given the price, features and sound."

Cons

You should be warned that this is a massive instrument. There are some who complain about limited sequencer features.

Overall

If you're looking for a synthesizer workstation with 88-key digital piano like playing feel, then definitely check out the Yamaha MODX8.

The Best Keyboard Workstations Between $2000 and $5000

Yamaha Montage 6

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 70+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$3000
Yamaha Montage 6 Synthesizer Workstation Keyboard 61-Key

The Yamaha Montage 6 is the 61-key model of Yamaha's Montage line of workstation synthesizers, packed with some of the best features that the brand has to offer.

What sets it apart from the competition is Yamaha's Motion Control Synthesis, which allows for fluid control and blending of its AWM2 and FM-X sound engines.

This feature is put to full use by a "Super Knob", which lets you apply realtime adjustments to multiple parameters. It can also be applied via Motion Sequences, where you can assign tempo-synched control sequences.

The main interface has a shorter 61-note keyboard with semi-weighted keys featuring aftertouch.

It also comes with a wide range of buttons, faders and knobs that give you more control over its recording and music production features.

It houses a powerful DSP effect engine that utilizes Yamaha's VCM (Virtual Circuit Modeling) to allow for a wide variety of effects from staples like HD reverb to modern Bit Crusher and more.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 61Semi-Weighted Keys with Aftertouch
  • Polyphony: 128 Note Stereo/Mono (AWM2), 128 Note FM-X
  • Sound Engine(s): AWM2, FM-X, Motion Control Synthesis Engine
  • Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel, Ribbon Controller
  • Effects: DSP effects engine: 12 x Reverbs, 15 x Master effects, 76 x Variation types, 5-band Master EQ, 1st part 3-band EQ
  • Audio Recording: Yes
  • Audio Playback: Yes (Wav)
  • Sequencer: 16-track, 64 songs, Performance Recorder version 2, Motion Sequencer
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x 1/4"
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/R), 2 x 1/4" (Assignable L/R), 1 x 1/4"(Headphones)
  • MIDI Inputs/Outputs: In/Out/Thru/USB
  • Other Connections: 2 x 1/4" (Foot controller), 1 x 1/4" (Assignable), 1 x 1/4" (Sustain)
  • USB: 1 x USB Type A, 1 x USB Type B (6 x 32)
  • Dimensions: 5.18” x 40.81” x 15.56”
  • Weight: 33.06 lbs.

Pros

Monstrous sound is a good summation of how many users feel about the Montage 6. Many are convinced that they got higher quality sounds over their previous workstation. Owners also credit its many sound synthesis and effect options for opening up their musical horizons. And as expected, the Super Knob feature gets a lot of thumbs up, giving users complex sounding transitions via a simple workflow. Reliability and aesthetic appeal are also appreciated by owners.

Cons

Some users caution that the learning curve is steep, but this is to be expected of flagship class workstation keyboards. Unfortunately the transport controls can not yet be assigned to a computer DAW - Yamaha's statement on this implies this feature will be available from a later update, but it's been a long time since they said that so don't count on it coming soon.

Overall

With Yamaha's reputation for quality, this powerful workstation synthesizer is well worth the investment for those who are into 61-note keybeds. If you prefer 88 keys then look at the Montage 8 below.

Korg Kronos 61-Key

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 100+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$3400
Korg Kronos 61-Key Synthesizer Workstation

At publication time this was the Highest Rated Keyboard Workstation Between $2000 and $5000.

The Korg Kronos 61-Key version showcases its enhanced SGX-2 Grand Piano engine, which offers resonant piano sounds and quality string patches.

It also provides real-time controllers, such as Korg's 4-way Vector joystick, a responsive ribbon controller, and a tap-and-drag color TouchView display for a more intuitive and hands-on control.

Its nine sound engines provide a huge collection of presets for a number of possibilities of combining different sounds.

It also has a sequencer that can record up to 16 MIDI tracks and 16 audio tracks.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 61 Natural Touch Semi Weighted keys
  • Polyphony: Varies Per Engine: SGX-2: 100 voices*3, EP-1: 104 voices, HD-1: 140 voices, AL-1: 80 voices, CX-3: 200 voices, STR-1: 40 voices, MOD-7: 52 voices, MS-20EX: 40 voices, PolysixEX: 180 voices
  • Sound Engine(s): 9 Engines: SGX-2: Premium Piano (Acoustic Piano), EP-1: MDS Electric Piano (Electric Piano), HD-1: High Definition Synthesizer (PCM), AL-1: Analog Synthesizer (Analog Modeling), CX-3: Tonewheel Organ (Tonewheel Organ Modeling), STR-1: Plucked Strings (Physical Modeling), MOD-7: Waveshaping VPM Synthesizer (VPM Synthesis), MS-20EX: Component Modeling Technology (Analog Modeling), PolysixEX: Component Modeling Technology (CMT Analog Modeling)
  • Controllers: Vector joystick, joystick, ribbon controller, switches 1 & 2
  • Effects: Over 197 Effects
  • Audio Recording: 4-track simultaneous recording, WAV file format 16bit/24bit.
  • Audio Playback: 16-Track Playback
  • Sequencer: 16-track MIDI sequencer + 16-track hard disk recorder + 1 master track.
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x 1/4" Line-in
  • Audio Outputs: 6 x 1/4" Line-out, 1 x 1/8" Headphones
  • MIDI Inputs/Outputs: In/Out/Thru
  • Other Connections: 3 x Pedal Input, 1 x S/PDIF Digital Input, 1 x S/PDIF Digital Output
  • USB: 2 x USB A (TYPE A), 1 x USB B (TYPE B)
  • Dimensions: 40.94” x 5.28” x 14.33”
  • Weight: 31.53 lbs.

Pros

Many keyboardists are very pleased with their overall experience using this workstation. The touchscreen is easy to use, allowing for quick sound selection for each layer. Controls and parameters, such as ones for transposing and effects, are easily accessible via the touchscreen. In terms of sound quality, many report that its pianos, organ and synth are top notch and have a much richer sound. The pads also get many positive mentions. Several experienced keyboard players enjoy designing their own sounds with the use of its multiple sound engines. Many were also pleased with how it allows the use of third party libraries when they needed to expand their collection.

Cons

There are a few musicians who aren't too pleased with the limitation on creating custom patterns, but this is more of a preference issue.

Overall

This is a great investment if you are looking for a professional grade workstation.

Yamaha Montage 8

94
GEARANK

94 out of 100. Incorporating 100+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$4000
Yamaha Montage 8 Synthesizer Workstation Keyboard

The Montage 8 is a powerful synthesizer workstation keyboard that utilizes Yamaha's modern sound processing technology and meets their quality standards.

It features an 88-note keybed with aftertouch and balanced hammer action, along with a number of assignable faders, buttons and knobs that give you control over the instrument and your DAW software.

Speaking of knobs, it has a big Super Knob that lets you adjust multiple parameters in real-time, thanks to the company's Motion Control technology.

It also comes with built-in DSP effects engine that lets you use a wide variety of reverbs, modulation and other effects.

Other features include 16-track sequencer, envelope follower and easy MIDI/USB connectivity.

Tech Specs

  • Keys: 81 Balanced Hammer Action Keys with Aftertouch
  • Polyphony: 128 Note Stereo/Mono (AWM2), 128 Note FM-X
  • Sound Engine(s): AWM2, FM-X, Motion Control Synthesis Engine
  • Controllers: Pitchbend, Mod Wheel, Ribbon Controller
  • Effects: DSP effects engine: 12 x Reverbs, 15 x Master effects, 76 x Variation types, 5-band Master EQ, 1st part 3-band EQ
  • Audio Recording: Yes
  • Audio Playback: Yes (Wav)
  • Sequencer: 16-track, 64 songs, Performance Recorder version 2
  • Audio Inputs: 2 x 1/4"
  • Audio Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/R), 2 x 1/4" (Assignable L/R), 1 x 1/4"(Headphones)
  • MIDI Inputs/Outputs: In/Out/Thru/USB
  • Other Connections: 2 x 1/4" (Foot controller), 1 x 1/4" (Assignable), 1 x 1/4" (Sustain)
  • USB: 1 x USB Type A, 1 x USB Type B (6 x 32)
  • Dimensions: 6.68” x 57.06” x 18.12”
  • Weight: 63.93 lbs.

Pros

Magnificent and amazing nicely encapsulates market response towards the Montage 8, impressing users with its sounds and sensitive controls. Even those who rate it lower have nothing but good words for its sound engine and keybed. Many are happy with how it performs as their main keyboard workstation for their home studio, serving as both their keyboard instrument and MIDI/DAW controller. It also gets a lot of thumbs up from stage performers that appreciate its versatility, Andy Jones of MusicTech agrees with this saying: "You will have to get your head around it to get the best from it, but it can take your efforts into sonic areas that will surprise and delight you, and areas you may not have considered."

Cons

Unfortunately the transport controls can not yet be assigned to a computer DAW - Yamaha's statement on this implies this feature will be available from a later update, but it's been a long time since they said that so don't count on it coming soon. It is also worth noting that this is bulky instrument, and may not be suitable as a portable instrument.

Overall

The Yamaha Montage 8 is highly recommended for those who want a premium stage synthesizer that can double as your main workstation controller.

Things to Consider when Buying a Keyboard Workstation

Differences between Workstation Keyboards and other Keyboards

Workstations are a type of keyboard meant to be an all-in-one instrument for composers, music producers and performers. As such they are generally equipped with almost everything that can accommodate your performance, recording and production needs. There are several functions that set them apart from digital pianos, arrangers and other professional keyboards, including MIDI/USB control and recording, audio recording, editing features and built-in effects that are helpful in creating and finalizing songs. Since they are meant for composing and recording songs, manufacturers tend to include massive sound libraries with a wide array of instruments. In addition to those aspects, most of them have good quality synthesizers that can be used for composing full-length multi-voice tracks.

Sound Quality and Quantity

Sound quality and quantity matters whether you plan to use your workstation to produce music or for general playing purposes. As mentioned above, workstations have a wide array of instrument presets, such as pianos, horns, strings, and percussion that are on par with the quality of what dedicated synthesizers can provide. A simple playback synth, or one with sample libraries, is a reasonable option if you want an authentic reproduction of sounds such as pianos, percussion, string section, and brass section. If you plan to incorporate electronic music, a workstation with an analog modeling synthesis feature also works well. Regarding sound quantity, it's highly recommended to look for a workstation that can handle and provide enough polyphony for playing and recording. The more notes it can handle, the more you can maximize your use of sequencing and recording multiple tracks.

Sequencing, Recording and Effects

Since workstations are designed to address composition and production needs, the main features to keep in mind are their sequencing and recording capabilities. Workstations already have built-in MIDI sequencers for capturing, adding and editing tracks. Some of them also have a microphone or line input that lets you incorporate audio to sequenced tracks. Another feature to consider that would take your recordings to the next level are its onboard effects. Most workstations have the basic built-in effects that can be applied to individual tracks and/or the whole mix. Some of them that have audio recording capabilities have EQ and dynamic related effects. These provide more flexibility when it comes to personalizing your final sound.

Memory Capacity

Memory is a considerable factor, especially when storing and accessing mixes. The types of memory you’ll find in a workstation are ROM and RAM. ROM lets you switch out different sound cards to access variety of sounds, while RAM is the amount of memory that can be used for recording, sampling and storing custom settings. It’s best to prioritize the amount ROM if you plan to focus on performing and playing the instrument. Otherwise for recording, it’s best to look for a large amount of RAM. Some workstations provide removable and expandable memory slots for memory cards and external hard drives too.

Other Features

Connectivity is also another feature to consider since a lot of them come with USB or 5-pin MIDI connections for connecting and syncing them to your computer. Good workstation keyboards can work well with DAW software, especially those with convenient control mapping features. There are some workstations that include an audio sampler. This enables you to import any audio file to incorporate to your mix as long as they are compatible with your workstation. Having audio inputs for directly recording instruments is another plus. These are some of the useful features that can maximize the use of your workstation.

Best Keyboard Workstation Selection Methodology

This guide was first published in 2018 written by Denise Azucena and the latest edition was published on February 22, 2022 written by Alexander Briones with contributions from Denise Azucena and Alden Acosta.

We began by looking at all the Workstation Keyboards available from major American online music gear stores and for this 2022 edition, we placed 26 of them on a short-list for further examination - you can see them in our Music Gear Database. We then examined feedback from users and experts in the form of written reviews, ratings and forum discussions, including the most recent feedback up to mid February 2022. All these data were then fed to the Gearank Algorithm to produce the rating scores out of 100 that you see above - there were over 4,000 sources analyzed during this process, which is nearly twice of what we processed in the previous edition. Finally, we selected the highest rated options to recommend in each of the price brackets above. For more information about our methods see How Gearank Works.

Comments

Publication of our May 2021

Publication of our May 2021 Edition resulted in the following workstation coming off the recommended list above, but you can still see our analysis of it: Korg Kross 2.

What are your opinions

What are your opinions regarding the Yamaha Genos and the Yamaha PSR-SX900 Workstations?

I understand that the Yamaha

I understand that the Yamaha Montage and MODX recently updated their onboard sequencer/recorder. Is it (the sequencer/recorder) on the same level as the MOXF? This has previously been the only reason for me not pulling the trigger on the newer Yamaha workstations.

Is there an advantage with

Is there an advantage with the newer Yamaha MODX over the MOXF series? Or should I stay with my MOXF8?

sold my roland FA series...it

Sold my roland FA series...it sucked bought an moxf instead, way better sounds...WAY

Very useful information..

Very useful information...well explained, but why Yamaha s970 is not here?

Roland FA series. Should not

Roland FA series. Should not be here at all. they suck. Cheap! Cheap! Every Corner they could cut was done. And then some. The D/A A/D converters are so bad it is unbelievable!

Thanks for sharing your

Thanks for sharing your opinion. When we produced this guide we examined over 800 opinions, over 90 of those were specific to the Roland FA-08, and based on the broad opinion of the market it did deserve to be included in our recommended list.

If you'd like to know more about how we do this analysis, please read How Gearank Works.