The Best Cheap Audio Interfaces - Under $100 & Under $200

The Highest Rated Audio Interfaces Under $200

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Ten years ago, to even think of putting up a home studio required hours of research into what gear to buy, how to set up your environment, and what software to get. Even then, the prices for audio interfaces were out of reach for the average musician.

These days recording music has never been easier: all you need is your computer, instrument, a microphone and a good audio interface. So many affordable audio interfaces have come out the past few years and it has come to where people are becoming more confused as to which audio interface to buy for their needs. We took it upon ourselves to do much of the research and selection for you to present you with a reliable list of current market favorites, updated December 2019.

The top-rated audio interfaces that we present in this guide do not exceed $200. This puts them in the range of most people who want to start out with recording or want a mobile alternative for recording on the go.

All the devices in this list are (or can be) USB Audio Class Compliant so they can work with all the significant modern operating system operating systems (Windows, MacOs, iOS, Linux, Android) with no need for drivers. This means your interface won't become an expensive paperweight if the manufacturer does not deliver updates for future platforms. Most of these also provide proprietary drivers for Windows and Mac and they may allow you to use enhanced features. iPad/iOS users should know they need to use the Apple lightning to USB adapter to connect to their device and the interfaces in the list will require an external power or a powered USB hub because the iPad doesn't provide sufficient USB Bus power.

NB: We have separate guides for interfaces with 4-Channels and more and for iPad interfaces.

The Best Cheap Audio Interfaces

The Best Audio Interfaces Under $100

Behringer U-Control UCA202

86
GEARANK

86 out of 100. Incorporating 2300+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$29
Behringer U-Control UCA202

The Behringer U-Control UCA202 has got to be one of the most ubiquitous audio interfaces on the market. Despite its unassuming appearance, it features 2 RCA inputs which you can use to plug in a stereo out from a mixer, or with the use of adaptors, instruments straight into the interface. It has 2 RCA outputs for monitor speakers.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 16-bit/48kHz
  • Preamp: None (RCA In Only)
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x RCA
  • Outputs: 2 x RCA. S/PDIF optical output
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Phantom Power: No
  • Bundled Software: Audacity DAW, KRISTAL Audio Engine DAW

Pros

Several reviewers use the UCA202 to convert old cassette tapes to digital while others use it as an affordable way to plug in a large format console mixer into a digital recording platform. Many recommend the interface for home studios on a budget as a multi-channel mixer feeding into the UCA202 via its stereo outputs is more than adequate for home recording.

Cons

"You get what you pay for" is a consistent sentiment with users as some said the unit lacked essential features found on newer, more expensive devices. Build quality was also an issue for some, so handle with care.

Overall

If it's your first time recording and you have a mixer already in your setup, or just want something for plugging your old cassette deck, vinyl player or stereo home component to record, having a small interface like the UCA202 might be all you need to get your tracks recorded. Avoid it if you plan on expanding. One thing to note is that Behringer released the UCA222 which is functionally the same unit housed in a red enclosure. Read about it here.

Shure X2U

89
GEARANK

89 out of 100. Incorporating 300+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$99
Shure X2U Microphone XLR to USB Audio Interface

No, it's not a vape. Humor aside, the Shure X2U is an unconventional audio interface. Instead of plugging a microphone into it, you plug it INTO your microphone. This allows you to have a very minimal setup if you only need to use one microphone similar to a USB powered mic but with the freedom to change microphones whenever you like. This includes large diaphragm condenser microphones since it has built in +48V Phantom power. Zero latency direct monitoring is also a handy feature.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 16-bit, up to 48 kHz
  • Preamp: Integrated preamp with Microphone Gain Control
  • Channels: 1
  • Inputs: 1
  • Outputs: Headphone Out, USB out
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: None

Pros

Promotional materials say "It turns any mic into a USB Mic!" and this is what most users who rated the X2U positive say. Users love how they can use their favorite mics with the unit on-the-go without needing to bring a typical interface and cables. The convenience of not having to bring so many components to record makes it a great tool for field recordings.

Cons

It is a tool for a very specific purpose and naturally people would want more out of it. But to add more would sacrifice the portability and convenience of the unit as a few users mentioned. Mics that need high gain like the Shure SM7b might hiss at higher input gain settings as a few users noted.

Overall

So you want an audio interface but you don't want to bring along a box and 2 different cables to set up. The Shure X2U solves that very specific problem. If you're looking for an interface that allows you to use your favorite mics on the go, the X2U is worth checking out. Just make sure you're using a mic that won't need a lot of gain as many users report hiss when pushing the preamp.

PreSonus AudioBox USB 96

85
GEARANK

85 out of 100. Incorporating 450+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$100
PreSonus AudioBox USB 96 2-Channel Audio Interface

Presonus markets the AudioBox USB 96 as a "Simple, affordable, mobile recording solution". It features two XLR/TRS Combo preamp inputs as well as MIDI I/O.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: up to 24-bit/96kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/instrument)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (main out), 1x 1/4" headphone out
  • MIDI: In/Out
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Studio One Artist

Pros

For such an affordable audio interface, many people loved that it has MIDI I/O which makes it easier to integrate other instruments and controllers like keys and e-drums and other MIDI-controlled equipment with the MIDI OUT.

Cons

Some report that the software included is severely limiting compared to the hardware.

Overall

If you're looking for an affordable audio interface with MIDI I/O, it's difficult to recommend anything else. The AudioBox ticks a lot of boxes feature-wise and is a good centerpiece in a project or home studio. Some found the included software to be limiting but that should not be a problem for most since the price of the interface leaves more in your wallet for a license for the DAW of your choice and more.

The Best Audio Interfaces Under $200

Focusrite Scarlett Solo 3rd Gen

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$110
Focusrite Scarlett Solo 3rd Gen USB Audio Interface

Focusrite has become the brand people first mention when people ask "What's a good interface?" and for good reason. The Scarlett series has always been very consistent regarding their preamps. Now on its third generation, Focusrite makes a winning formula even better with increased headroom, an even lower THD (total harmonic distortion) level, better gain range and handling of high output instruments, and overall better dynamics.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 1
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR (mic), 1 x 1/4" (Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS
  • MIDI: 1 x 1/4"
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Pro Tools First Focusrite Creative Pack, Focusrite Red plugin suite, several more

Pros

The Scarlett Solo gets rave reviews from both first-timers and professionals noting the simplicity to be a plus rather than a downside. The Scarlett Solo shares the same signal conversion and preamp with all the products in the line and many reviewers think the Solo is a great value for people who are looking for top quality audio but don't need all the other bells and whistles.

Cons

Some users report crackling and sound loss but comments on these posts point to their computers not being up to spec to handle low buffer size. A tweak in the latency/buffer size settings on the driver fixes most of these issues.

Overall

There's not much more to be said about Focusrite Scarlett interfaces that hasn't been mentioned with each new generation. For this version, the improved signal handling and gain problems that users complained about in their first gen (and sometimes even in the second gen) have been resolved. Get it if you want a piece of the Focusrite pie. Be careful though, once you've had the sweetness of Focusrite preamps, it will be difficult to use anything else until you go beyond the budget scope of this guide.

Steinberg UR22 MK2

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 900+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$165
Steinberg UR22 MK2 USB Audio Interface for iPad, Mac and PC

More popularly known for their music production software, they are becoming known for recording hardware. And since Steinberg is owned by Yamaha, Steinberg's software know-how and Yamaha's hardware expertise combine to produce highly rated interfaces with improved DAW compatibility. This includes the Steinberg UR22 MK2 which features two Yamaha D-Pre mic preamps, the same ones found on more expensive mixing consoles. Complementing the preamp section is the unit's high-quality analog to digital converter, with up to 192kHz sampling rate at 24-bits. It also comes equipped with Class Compliant mode for improved compatibility with different platforms. Other noteworthy features include MIDI connectivity, zero-latency hardware monitoring, and Loopback mode for live streaming audio while recording.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2 x Yamaha D-Pre Mic Preamps
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" Combo (Mic/Line, 1 input switchable to Hi-Z/Instrument)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" Line Out, 1 x 1/4" Headphones
  • MIDI: In/Out
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Phantom Power: 48V
  • Bundled Software: Cubasis LE (iOS), Cubase AI (Mac/PC)

Pros

The Steinberg UR22 MK2's sound quality continues to satisfy, if not exceed, the expectations of many. Build quality along with its intuitive controls and operational stability are also well appreciated. While it is specifically designed to work with Steinberg's Cubase, it's right at home with all the other DAWs, including Audacity, Pro Tools, Logic Pro and many more.

Cons

There are some concerns over driver installation and the bundled software, but these are probably because of user inexperience rather than design fault. Those using the unit in class compliant mode have no complaints. Sound drop-outs are reported by some users on specific computers/laptops, but it's hard to pin these problems on the UR22.

Overall

If you are primarily a Cubase user, or if you switch between multiple DAWs, then you might want to consider the Steinberg UR22 MK2.

Yamaha AG03

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$150
Yamaha AG03 3-Channel Mixer Audio Interface for iPad / Mac / PC

Instead of conventional front mounted controls, the Yamaha AG03 sports a mixer like interface where controls are mounted on top, complete with knobs and faders. It comes with two channels, with the first one sporting Yamaha's D-Pre mic preamp with phantom power support and a dedicated fader for volume adjustments. The second channel supports high impedance input (passive pickups from electric guitars, electric bass etc) and line level input. This unit is USB bus powered, and comes with DSP effects that include filtering, reverb and compression, along with loopback for use with online audio/video streaming platforms.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 1 x Yamaha D-Pre Mic Preamps
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR-1/4" Combo, 1 x 1/4" Hi-Z, 2 x 1/4" Line Input
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4", 1 x Stereo RCA, 2 x 1/4" Headset
  • MIDI: USB
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Phantom Power: 48V
  • Bundled Software: Cubase AI (Mac/PC), Cubasis LE

Pros

Thanks to the Yamaha AG03's intuitive mixer interface, most users applaud this unit for its ease of use. There are also many who report that the Yamaha AG03 helped improve their productivity by simplifying their setup, while others are happy with its sound quality.

Cons

Other than the few who wish for a MIDI input/output, there aren't any notable concerns with the Yamaha AG03.

Overall

With its intuitive interface, great sound quality and build quality, the Yamaha AG03 is very easy to recommend.

Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen

92
GEARANK

92 out of 100. Incorporating 175+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$160
Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen USB Audio Interface

The Scarlett series has long been a darling with the project studio community for its great sound quality, solid build and great plugin bundles. The 3rd Gen release of the line makes minor tweaks that improve the overall capabilities of each model especially the way they handle high gain inputs from mics and instruments. The 2i2 is no exception to these improvements as the unit now includes Focusrite's proprietary "Air" technology from their ISA series preamps.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: Up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/line/Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Pro Tools First Creative Pack, Red Plug-in Suite, Focusrite Collective access

Pros

Many consider the Scarlett 2i2 as their first "serious" interface. Many users have upgraded from other brands and felt like the 2i2 is the best at the price point for their purposes. With no compromises made in the entire line regarding the preamp and signal converters, the 3rd Gen 2i2 is well loved in the community for both small home studios and mobile setups.

Cons

No MIDI turned off a few from this interface though they still ended up getting a different Scarlett Interface - you can always get a separate MIDI interface if you need one later.

Overall

This is THE interface to get if you want pristine recordings for voice, instruments, and more. With the tweaked gain response of the preamp, even the highest output metal pickups get the same red carpet treatment to your hard drive as the nicest vintage T-style guitar.

Audient ID4

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 225+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$199
Audient ID4 USB Audio Interface 2-in/2-out

At time of publication this was the highest rated audio interface under $200.

The ID4 is an audio interface that features Audient's class A mic preamp and JFET circuit packed in a compact unit. It provides all-in-one solution for recording vocals and instruments, two things that most home studios need. And judging by how the Audient ID4 continues to rake in high scoring reviews, they may have found the best balance of features, price and cost in the ID4.

Besides its two distinct input circuits, Audient equipped the ID4 with essential output options that include 2 x 1/4" outs for stereo monitoring, and two headphone outputs. Other practical features include monitor mixing (input and processed sound), monitor mute and monitor panning. Being class compliant, this audio interface works with popular operating systems, including Apple's OSX and iOS, and Windows. Note that this unit is USB bus powered, so it will get the power from your desktop or laptop computer. It can also work with Apple iPad and iPhone, but it requires a powered USB hub to work.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/96kHz
  • Preamp: 1 x Audient Class A Mic Preamp, 1 x JFET DI
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR-1/4" Combo (Mic/Line), 1 x 1/4" DI (Instrument)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" Monitor, 1 x 1/4" (Headphones), 1 x 1/8" (Headphones)
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB Bus Powered
  • Phantom Power: 48V

Pros

The Audient ID4 continues to get high scores for its sound and build quality, from users of different backgrounds including singers, instrumentalists, voice over artists, home studio owners and more. Sound quality is its biggest strength, while its reliability is a close second. It also helps that the ID4 is easy on the eyes and compact, making it an inspiring tool to use in the studio or while on the move.

Cons

There are a few users who dislike the transparency of ID4's mic preamp. There are also a few who gave lower scores for lack of MIDI in/out.

Overall

If you're looking to maximize your $200 and want no less than what the market rates as the best, then get the Audient ID4.

Things to Consider when Buying a Cheap Audio Interface

  • Number of Channels

    2 channel audio interfaces and even single channel ones are good enough for most home recordings because you have the option to record vocals and instruments one by one and mix them down later. But if you're planning on recording over two sound sources simultaneously, then you'll want to consider those with 4 channels or more.

  • Input Ports

    Most audio interfaces use "combo" inputs which accept both XLR and 1/4" jacks. Since they are essentially 2-in-1 ports, they allow for smaller form factors and help reduce the cost of the product. They also simplify connections for users, and allow for worry free connection of mics and instruments. Note that some still use traditional XLR and 1/4" ports, especially older devices. We have listed the types and number of inputs available for each of the audio interfaces in this list for your perusal.

  • Instrument Level and Line Level Inputs

    Often neglected by beginners, know if your audio interface can handle line level (low impedance) and instrument level (high impedance) sources. Line level sources include keyboards and other electronic instruments, while instrument level ports are for guitars and basses with no active preamp. While you can use a DI box if your interface doesn't support instrument level, it is more convenient to plug straight in to your interface. So if you're planning to record multiple types of instruments and mics, you'll want one that allows for switching the input between mic, instrument and line levels.

  • Mic Preamps and Phantom Power

    • Mic Preamp Quality
      When using mics, the preamps can play a part in the resulting character of the sound. For versatile home recording use, you'll ones that are transparent. These aim to reproduce the sound coming in as accurately as possible. Thankfully, this is what the audio interfaces in this list provide, but there are others who prefer preamps that can subtly color the sound.
    • Phantom Power
      If you haven't yet, you will end up using a condenser mic at some point when recording. These mics typically require between 11V and 48V phantom power to operate, and so it is imperative to check if the audio interface that you're buying can provide the required phantom power.
  • Analog to Digital Bit Rate and Sample Rate

    This is the rate at which your analog signal is converted into digital data. The higher the sample rate, the more detail is captured. However this does not indicate good or bad recording quality, rather it is the preamp that dictates this more. 24–bit and 44.1 to 96kHz sample rate is the standard, and should be more than enough for home recording use.

  • Computer and iPad Compatibility

    If you want to ensure that your audio interface can work with the widest possible range of operating systems and is 'future proof' then get one that is USB Audio Class Compliant. This is also known a 'Plug and Play' and it means that you won't need to depend on the manufacturer's drivers for it to operate with the widest range of current and future operating systems. Users of iOS, Android and Linux in particular need to look out for this because sometimes drivers either can't be used or aren't provided/updated. But even Windows and Mac users can be left stranded when a new OS version comes out and the manufacturer does not make new drivers available. Although the proprietary manufacturer drivers can provide access to extra features it's handy to know your interface can keep working long after the drivers have stopped being updated.

    If you have an iPad and you want to use it for mobile recording, then you should also consider interfaces that can directly connect with them. For USB interfaces you'll need to purchase Apple's camera connection kit (CCK) or Lightning to USB Adapter to convert regular USB jacks into iPad compatible ports. Under this setup you also need to be aware of providing power to the interface. The easiest way to find one suitable for the iPad is to read our guide to:
    The Best iPad Audio Interfaces

  • Power Options

    The ability to be powered via USB is a convenient option that many modern day audio interfaces utilize. While those that use "wall warts" or power adapters are still viable, having the option to get power from the USB is a welcome plus because it can help reduce clutter, and allow for mobile use when there is no power outlet to plug into. Some audio interfaces have the option to be powered by regular batteries for even more portability.

  • Bundled Software and Drivers

    To be able to use audio interfaces, you will need a good Digital Audio Workstation or DAW. Thankfully, cheap interfaces are bundled with various kinds of DAWs that are quite useful, albeit with some limitations. Still many of these free applications have enough features to handle the recording and mixing needs of conventional music.

Cheap Audio Interface Selection Methodology

This guide was first published on December 20, 2015 written by Alexander Briones and the latest major update was published on December 3, 2019 written by recording engineer Raphael Pulgar with contributions from Alexander.

We first looked at all audio interfaces within the $200 price ceiling, which includes single channel, dual channel and four channel audio interfaces. We ended up with a short list of 34 audio interfaces, and we analyzed relevant reviews and ratings, including the most current ones. For this December 2019 update, the number of review sources that we processed went up to more than 19,300 from just over 11,000 last year. The Gearank Algorithm processed this staggering amount of data and gave us the rating scores out of 100 we used to narrow the list to just the best among the best. Finally, we divided our recommendations into two price ranges to make it easier to spot those that fit your budget. In addition, we've included detailed descriptions and specifications for each audio interface, along with noteworthy pros and cons that were reported by actual users. For more information about our methods see How Gearank Works.

Comments

Focusrite Scarlett - "Some

Focusrite Scarlett - "Some users report crackling and sound loss but comments on these posts point to their computers not being up to spec to handle low buffer size. A tweak in the latency/buffer size settings on the driver fixes most of these issues."

If only it were so simple. I use an 18i20 plus Octopre for 16-track recording. Results are excellent, but I simply cannot use Focusrite for playback at home. I have a powerful desktop rig which should in theory handle the task without breaking a sweat, but despite trying every suggestion I've been able to find, plus contact with customer support, I've given up.

I record on my Focusrites and use a Zoom R8 for playback.

The Scarletts are a nice series but I would not in good conscience recommend them to anybody who wants hassle-free ASIO audio.

Save your money and get the

Save your money and get the cheaper version two inputs AI.You can only record a vocal and a guitar one at the time. You only need 4 or more if you intent to have the whole live band come to your basement and they all plug their instruments into your Au.interface, and then your computer blows up in two minutes.

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