The Best Cheap Audio Interfaces - Under $100 & Under $200

The Highest Rated Audio Interfaces Under $200

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By now, audio interfaces are more or less an extension of many computer setups beyond just recording. What used to be an extra piece of gear that enables recording, is now an essential peripheral.

These days, even the cheapest audio interfaces have high quality A/D - D/A converters, preamps and headphone amplification. The competition between manufacturers for the best value interface is so heated that many affordable interfaces offer so much at the price point.

This also makes it very confusing to choose which ones that fit your needs the best. While many interfaces share the same basic features, each manufacturer has different technologies and at a more noticeable level, different "sounds" because of the preamp technology they employ.

In this Edition, we introduce a streamlined list of must-pick audio interfaces and outline the pros and cons of each so you come to a more informed buying decision. I also personally review an affordable interface that I have plenty of experience with.

All the devices in this list are (or can be) USB Audio Class Compliant so they can work with all the significant modern operating systems (Windows, macOS, iOS, Linux, Android) with no need for drivers. This means your interface won't become an expensive paperweight if the manufacturer does not deliver updates for future platforms. Most of these also provide proprietary drivers for Windows and Mac which may allow you to use enhanced features. iPad/iOS users should know they need to use the Apple Lightning to USB adapter to connect to their device and the interfaces in the list will require external power or a powered USB hub because the iPad doesn't provide sufficient USB Bus power.

NB: We have separate guides for interfaces with 2-Channels and more and for iPad interfaces.

The Best Cheap Audio Interfaces

Author & Contributors

Raphael PulgarRaphael Pulgar

I've been an audio engineer for 20 years specializing in rock and metal recordings, and also I play guitar and produce original music for my band and other content creators.

Author's Pick

Below is an audio interface I often recommend to new producers and streamers for its quality, affordability and availability.

Focusrite Scarlett Solo 3rd Gen Review

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 19250+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$120
Focusrite Scarlett Solo 3rd Gen USB Audio Interface

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Audio Interface Under $200 along with the Focusrite Scarlett 2i2.

Focusrite has become a household name ever since the introduction of their compact audio interfaces. The Scarlett Solo is one of their best-selling and most well known product lines.

When I was looking for an audio interface to get my home studio started a few years ago, Focusrite was the first thing that was recommended to me by my peers. My first Focusrite interface was a first generation Scarlett 4i4 that I used to great success until I needed an upgrade. After that, I bought a Focusrite 18i20 to expand the I/O available to me.

When I had the 2nd gen 18i20 on my minimized workstation, it occupied a large portion of my desk. At that point, I wasn't recording drums and multiple input sources anymore so I found the multiple inputs redundant. Replacing it with the compact Solo was the logical choice for me.

The Solo sports a basic set of outputs: a pair of L/R 1/4" outputs for studio monitors and a 1/4" stereo headphone out. New for the 3rd gen is the addition of Focusrite Air. Focusrite describes Air as an emulation of their ISA preamp tonality. To my ears, it adds upper midrange and high frequency harmonics on top of your signal. This is great if you're using warmer sounding microphones and dynamic mics.

Focusrite Scarlett Solo Front Angle View
See more pictures in this Focusrite Scarlett Solo Review.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 1
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR combo (mic), 1 x 1/4" (Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS
  • MIDI: None
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Pro Tools First Focusrite Creative Pack, Focusrite Red plugin suite, several more

Supporting Information

Pros

I find the Solo shared a very similar recording quality as the more expensive 18i20. In fact, I felt that the Solo had just a bit more mic gain on tap, enough to drive my Shure SM57 properly without an inline preamp. The 3rd gen Solo was also noticeably quieter with dynamic mics compared to the 18i20.

With condenser mics, the Solo shines with delicate sounding vocals with just the right amount of high end crispness to help a solo vocal stand out from a piano or acoustic guitar instrumental.

Cons

For line-in sources and instruments, the DI tracks are slightly underwhelming compared to the preamp's performance with vocals. It's not bad but not quite on par with the dynamics and clarity of other instrument/DI inputs from other interfaces.

The "Air" feature, while nice on some mics, has a tradeoff of raising the noise floor a bit and making some mics sound brittle on the high frequencies.

The Headphone and Speaker outs share a volume so you have to turn off your speakers when you want to mix on headphones. The headphone out was also unable to drive my 250 Ohm Beyerdynamic DT 770 Pro headphones efficiently.

Some users report crackling and sound loss but comments on these posts point to their computers not being up to spec to handle low buffer sizes. A tweak in the latency/buffer size settings on the driver fixes most of these issues. This is also a persistent issue when using communication apps like Discord*, although Focusrite has told us the next driver will solve this problem.

*Note: Focusrite reached out to us to say that the next driver update will fix the Discord bug - you can download the pre-release Beta version if you want to try it.

Overall

With the Air preamp feature, additional gain on tap, the Scarlett Solo still earns its way into the desks of tens of thousands of musicians, voice over artists, podcasters, and streamers all over the world. Get it if you want a compact audio interface that does a great job pairing with even the most expensive microphones thanks to its preamp and Air feature.

The Best Audio Interfaces Under $100

Behringer U-PHORIA UMC202HD

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 4750+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$89
Behringer U-PHORIA UMC202HD 2-Channel USB Audio Interface

While it may not be as big of a household name as SSL or Neve, MIDAS has been making recording consoles for decades. Even Behringer's flagship digital mixers like the X32 feature preamps designed by MIDAS.

With the new trend of adding console-level preamps on affordable audio interfaces on the rise, Behringer was quick to catch up thanks to their acquisition of MIDAS in 2009.

Their expertise and tonality has finally been adapted to interfaces like the Behringer U-Phoria UMC202HD. Some have compared the tonality of MIDAS preamps as similar to the color of API consoles and preamps. For the unfamiliar, the tonality feels smooth and clean in contrast to the sheen of Neve and the grit of SSL.

Paired with studio-grade 24-bit/192kHz resolution converters, the UMC202HD provides very good recording quality for this price point.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR/TRS Combo
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4", 1 x 1/4" (Headphones)
  • MIDI: None
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Tracktion DAW and 150 downloadable instrument/effect plug-ins

Supporting Information

Pros

Many users praise the UMC202HD for its great price to performance ratio. The onboard MIDAS preamps were noted to make vocals have depth and dimension. The build quality was also a surprise for some who didn't expect a good metal enclosure and solid feeling knobs at this price point.

Cons

The USB jack is seen as a weak point in an otherwise solidly built interface, especially when newer interfaces have begun adapting USB-C as a standard jack.

Overall

The Behringer UMC202HD is a great, affordable interface with tech developed by longtime console maker MIDAS. Surprisingly good build quality comes as a bonus at this price point. Get it if you're on a budget but don't want to compromise on raw recording tonality.

Shure X2U

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 650+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$99
Shure X2U Microphone XLR to USB Audio Interface

At publication time this was the Highest Rated Audio Interface Under $100 - for the fourth Edition in a row!

The Shure X2U is an unconventional audio interface.

Instead of plugging a microphone into it, you plug it INTO your microphone.

This allows you to have a very minimal setup if you only need to use one microphone similar to a USB powered mic but with the freedom to change microphones whenever you like.

This includes using large-diaphragm condenser microphones since it has built-in +48V Phantom power.

Zero-latency direct monitoring is also a handy feature.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: 16-bit, up to 48 kHz
  • Preamp: Integrated preamp with Microphone Gain Control
  • Channels: 1
  • Inputs: 1
  • Outputs: Headphone Out, USB out
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: None

Supporting Information

Pros

Promotional materials say "It turns any mic into a USB Mic!" and this is what most users who rated the X2U positively say. Users love how they can use their favorite mics with the unit on-the-go without needing to bring a typical interface and cables. The convenience of not having to bring so many components to record makes it a great tool for field recordings.

Cons

It is a tool for a very specific purpose and naturally people would want more out of it. But to add more would sacrifice the portability and convenience of the unit as a few users mentioned. Mics that need high gain like the Shure SM7b might hiss at higher input gain settings as a few users noted.

Overall

So you want an audio interface but you don't want to bring along a box and 2 different cables to set up? The Shure X2U solves that very specific problem. If you're looking for an interface that allows you to use your favorite mics on the go, the X2U is worth checking out. Just make sure you're using a mic that won't need a lot of gain as many users report hiss when pushing the preamp.

The Best Audio Interfaces Under $200

Native Instruments Komplete Audio 2

92
GEARANK

92 out of 100. Incorporating 600+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$139

Here's the scenario: You're inspired to start music production after being fascinated by the music production process or after being absorbed into a genre that you want to make some yourself. You look up tutorials on how to make music and see these producers with a massive collection of virtual instruments, plugins and run them on professional looking DAWs.

Software is a big barrier to entry towards the kind of music production that quite a few people want to pursue. Electronic music makes use of these virtual instruments and plugins for their sound. That being said, even the best audio interfaces often include just the essentials such as a watered-down DAW and some rudimentary plugins.

Many interfaces come with bundled software but Native Instruments' Komplete Audio 2 interface feels more like a software package with a free bundled interface.

On the hardware, the Komplete Audio 2 sports two combo XLR jacks with line / instrument switches. This enables recording with a stereo pair of microphones or stereo out from keyboards.

It also includes a direct monitor blend knob to tweak the signal you hear between input and playback. A large volume knob sits on top of the interface.

Lastly a high visibility VU meter up top lets you see just how much gain you're running your inputs with.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: Up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/line/Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS, 1 x 1/4" Headphone
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live 10 Lite, Maschine Essentials, Komplete Start

Supporting Information

Pros

Many users purchased the Komplete Audio 2 for its bundled software from Native Instruments. It is an incredible value package that includes not only plugins, but virtual instruments, effects and amp simulations as well. This is great for those who want a full suite of software right out of the box without purchasing anything else. Users report that the interface is plug and play and the software bundles were easy to install and get up and running.

Cons

Some users experienced issues with the mic preamps being noisy or unbalanced. A few had trouble with long term durability and build quality.

Overall

If you're looking to produce music in the box and need a lot of software to get you started, the Native Instruments Komplete Audio 2 is a good choice. If you'll be focusing more on recording with mics, it might not be the best in that regard.

Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 12550+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$180
Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen USB Audio Interface

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Audio Interface Under $200 along with the Focusrite Scarlett Solo.

The Scarlett series has long been a darling with the project studio community for its great sound quality, solid build, and great plugin bundles.

The 3rd Gen release of the line makes minor tweaks that improve the overall capabilities of each model especially the way they handle high gain inputs from mics and instruments.

The 2i2 is no exception to these improvements as the unit now includes Focusrite's proprietary "Air" technology from their more expensive ISA series preamps.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: Up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/line/Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS
  • MIDI: No
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Pro Tools First Creative Pack, Red Plug-in Suite, Focusrite Collective access

Supporting Information

Pros

Many consider the Scarlett 2i2 as their first "serious" interface. Many users have upgraded from other brands and felt like the 2i2 is the best at this price point for their purposes. With no compromises made in the entire line regarding the preamp and signal converters, the 3rd Gen 2i2 is well-loved in the community for both small home studios and mobile setups.

Cons

Not having MIDI turned off a few from this interface though they still ended up getting a different Scarlett Interface - you can always get a separate MIDI interface if you need one later.

Overall

This is THE interface to get if you want pristine recordings for voice, instruments, and more. With the tweaked gain response of the preamp, even the highest output metal pickups get the same red carpet treatment to your hard drive as the nicest vintage T-style guitar.

Audient iD4 MKII

92
GEARANK

92 out of 100. Incorporating 425+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$199
Audient iD4 MKII USB-C Audio Interface

Audient builds on the popularity of their original iD4 compact audio interface by releasing a MKII version.

Audient’s ASP8024-HE console preamp makes an appearance on this small, but powerful audio interface.

The large volume knob can also be assigned as a one-knob DAW controller. This makes it convenient to make fader movements and add adds a tactile mixing experience akin to a dedicated 1-fader DAW controller.

Besides the speaker outs, two audiophile-grade 600Ω headphone amplifiers with dual independent outputs (1/4" and 1/8") round out the monitoring options.

A USB-C connection ensures the iD4 MKII's compatibility going into the future.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x 1/4" (instrument), 1 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/line)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" (L/R)
  • MIDI: None
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: ARC software suite

Supporting Information

Pros

Users praise the quality of the preamps, citing the transparency and preservation of the dynamics as its best qualities. The headphone amplification was also praised for its ability to drive high impedance headphones like the Sennheiser HD600 with ease.

Cons

The only con we could find was from a user who received a defective product. Be sure to purchase products from retailers with a good exchange policy in these rare instances.

Overall

The Audient iD4 has top tier features in a more affordable price for an audio interface. If you're looking for a great interface with great converters and headphone amplifiers, this is the one to get.

MOTU M2

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 1450+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$200
MOTU M2 2x2 USB-C Audio Interface

Mark of the Unicorn, or MOTU for short, took the audio engineering community by surprise when they released their M2 and M4 Audio Interfaces.

MOTU interfaces have a good track record for quality and long-term use though it is only with their release of the M2 and M4 that their renowned premium quality has been made more affordable.

The M2 features up to 192kHz,120dB output dynamic range, and -129dBu EIN input dynamic range -- specifications not usually seen on interfaces at this price.

Tech Specs

  • A/D Resolution: up to 24-bit/192kHz
  • Preamp: 2
  • Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR-1/4" combo (mic/line/Hi-Z)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" TRS (DC coupled), 1 x Dual RCA Stereo
  • MIDI: In/Out/USB
  • Power: USB bus powered
  • Phantom Power: +48V
  • Bundled Software: MOTU Performer Lite, Ableton Live 10 Lite, Bundled Loops/Sounds

Supporting Information

Pros

Many users were delighted by the fact that MOTU gear has now become more accessible. Despite being a more budget-oriented interface, many users loved the low noise floor, low latency, and great compatibility that the M2 offers. While some users mentioned they had troubles with getting the gain staging right with other interfaces, the MOTU M2 allowed them to record very dynamic tracks with lower noise and higher headroom compared to certain "Red" interfaces they've used before.

Cons

An early issue arose about the Phantom power button not working that may have been resolved since no new reviews have brought up the issue. Some report "crackling" sounds when they record. However, upon checking the comments on some, they have been resolved by changing the buffer size as the default may be too low for their hardware.

Overall

If you're looking for top-of-the-line quality at a surprisingly affordable price, the MOTU M2 will more than satisfy your needs.

Things to Consider when Buying a Cheap Audio Interface

Number of Channels

2 channel audio interfaces and even single-channel ones are good enough for most home recordings because you have the option to record vocals and instruments one by one and mix them down later. But if you're planning on recording over two sound sources simultaneously, then you'll want to consider those with 4 channels or more.

Input Ports

Most audio interfaces use "combo" inputs which accept both XLR and 1/4" jacks. Since they are essentially 2-in-1 ports, they allow for smaller form factors and help reduce the cost of the product. They also simplify connections for users and allow for worry-free connection of mics and instruments. Note that some still use traditional separate XLR and 1/4" ports, especially older devices. We have listed the types and number of inputs available for each of the audio interfaces in this list for your perusal.

Instrument Level and Line Level Inputs

Often neglected by beginners, know if your audio interface can handle line level (low impedance) and instrument level (high impedance) sources. Line level sources include keyboards and other electronic instruments, while instrument level ports are for guitars and basses with no active preamp. While you can use a DI box if your interface doesn't support the instrument level, it is more convenient to plug straight into your interface. So if you're planning to record multiple types of instruments and mics, you'll want one that allows for switching the input between mic, instrument, and line levels.

Mic Preamps and Phantom Power

  • Mic Preamp Quality
    When using mics, the preamps can play a significant part in the resulting character of the sound. For versatile home recording use, you'll ones that are transparent. These aim to reproduce the sound coming in as accurately as possible. Thankfully, this is what the audio interfaces in this list provide, but others prefer preamps that can subtly color the sound.
  • Phantom Power
    If you haven't yet, you will end up using a condenser mic at some point when recording. These mics typically require between 11V and 48V phantom power to operate, and so it is imperative to check if the audio interface that you're buying can provide the required phantom power.

A/D Converter Sample Rate and Bit Depth

These two parameters determine how much of the analog audio signal is preserved when converting it to digital. The higher the number, the finer the details captured. The frequency range is determined by halving the sample rate (i.e. 48kHz sample rates can capture up to 24kHz in the high frequencies). Bit depth determines how much dynamics in the amplitude of your signal are preserved in the analog-to-digital conversion. While the converters determine the resolution of the audio being recorded, the quality and tonality of the recordings are more affected by other parts of the signal chain coming before it such as the preamps, cables and microphones. As a general guideline, The higher the Sample Rate and Bit Depth a device is capable of, the higher its potential to capture better resolution audio. This is important especially with storage sizes now growing to accommodate the larger file sizes higher resolution brings.

Computer and iPad Compatibility

If you want to ensure that your audio interface can work with the widest possible range of operating systems and is 'future proof' then get one that is USB Audio Class Compliant. This is also known a 'Plug and Play' and it means that you won't need to depend on the manufacturer's drivers for it to operate with the widest range of current and future operating systems. Users of iOS, Android and Linux in particular need to look out for this because sometimes drivers either can't be used or aren't provided/updated. But even Windows and Mac users can be left stranded when a new OS version comes out and the manufacturer does not make new drivers available. Although the proprietary manufacturer drivers can provide access to extra features, it's handy to know your interface can keep working long after the drivers have stopped being updated.

If you have an iPad and you want to use it for mobile recording, then you should also consider interfaces that can directly connect with them. For USB interfaces you'll need to purchase Apple's camera connection kit (CCK) or Lightning to USB Adapter to convert regular USB jacks into iPad compatible ports. Under this setup, you also need to be aware of providing power to the interface. The easiest way to find one suitable for the iPad is to read our guide to: The Best iPad Audio Interfaces.

Power Options

The ability to be powered via USB is a convenient option that many modern-day audio interfaces utilize. While those that use "wall warts" or power adapters are still viable, having the option to get power from the USB is a welcome plus because it can help reduce clutter, and allow for mobile use when there is no power outlet to plug into. Some audio interfaces have the option to be powered by regular batteries for even more portability.

Bundled Software and Drivers

To be able to use audio interfaces, you will need a good DAW (Digital Audio Workstation) software for recording. Thankfully, cheap interfaces are bundled with various kinds of DAWs that are quite useful, albeit with some limitations. Still many of these free applications have enough features to handle the recording and mixing needs of conventional music.

Cheap Audio Interface Selection Methodology

The first Edition was published in 2015 and the current Edition was published on April 28, 2022.

We first looked at all audio interfaces with at least 1 microphone input under $200, which includes single-channel, dual-channel, and four-channel audio interfaces. We ended up with a shortlist of 37 audio interfaces, and we analyzed relevant reviews and ratings, including the most current ones. For this April 2022 Edition, the number of review sources that we processed reached over 85,500. The Gearank Algorithm processed this staggering amount of data and gave us the rating scores out of 100 we used to narrow the list to just the best among the best. Finally, we divided our recommendations into two price ranges to make it easier to spot those that fit your budget. Also, we've included detailed descriptions and specifications for each audio interface, along with summaries of noteworthy pros and cons that were reported by actual users. For more information about our methods see How Gearank Works.

About the Author and Contributors

Here are the key people and sources involved in this guide's production - click on linked names for information about their music industry backgrounds.

Lead Author & Researcher

Raphael PulgarRaphael Pulgar

I've been an audio engineer for 20 years specializing in rock and metal recordings, and also I play guitar and produce original music for my band and other content creators.

Some of the recording gear I use in my studio includes the Focusrite Scarlett 18i20, Focusrite Scarlett Solo, Samson QH4 Headphone Amp and Cloudlifter CL-1. My mics include Aston Origin, Aston Element, Shure SM57, Rode NT1, Rode PodMic and MXL V67G.

Contributors

Alexander Briones: Supplemental writing.
Jason Horton: Editing and Illustrating.

Media

Main/Top Image: Compiled by Gearank.com using photographs of the Shure X2U and Focusrite Scarlett 2i2 3rd Gen interfaces.

The individual product images were sourced from websites, promotional materials or supporting documentation provided by their respective manufacturers.

Comments

hi, looking to digitise my

hi, looking to digitise my vinyl.
Would you recommend the Motu over Focusrite for this ? I have a Macboook 2020 with 4 thunderbolts.

Hello,

Hello,

Either would work but check what outputs your vinyl player has. If it only has RCA outs, even a behringer UCA222 would do. But if your player has balanced XLR outs, I'd personally go for the Focusrite. MOTU is great too as the noise floor is better on it so if that's important to you (especially if you have an older vinyl player).

-Raphael

damn all the cons in this

Damn all the cons in this review were explained very well. Good show.

Hi, Matt!

Hi, Matt!

Thanks for the feedback! I'm glad I was able to help achieve some clarity.

-Raphael

I have an old Line6 Toneport

I have an old Line6 Toneport UX2. I was wondering how these compare to the units you just reviewed?

Hi Bob,

Hi Bob,

The Toneport UX2 (and its identical successor, the Studio UX2) was popular in the early 2010s because of it's relatively low price and bundled software (Pod Farm). Mostly metal players picked it up because several popular bands at the time attributed their tone to either the "Big Bottom" model (for a number of British bands) and the "Cali Diamond Plate" model (for mostly American bands).

In our database, the Studio UX2 gets a score of 81 out of 100 as of April 2020; which is par for the course. Though the unit gets good reviews for its easy of access and bundled software, it gets low reviews for its build quality and longevity. Many UX2 users report long term part failure.

For sound quality as a general purpose audio interface, the UX2's preamps just aren't up to par with modern audio interfaces that have higher quality components and circuitry at accessible prices.

My advice: Try it out, and if it still works, I think the Pod Farm software is still available for downloads for legacy users. The Cali Diamond Plate doesn't sound like the Mesa Dual Rectifier it seeks to emulate but it fits well with most mixes.

-Raphael

Focusrite Scarlett - "Some

Focusrite Scarlett - "Some users report crackling and sound loss but comments on these posts point to their computers not being up to spec to handle low buffer size. A tweak in the latency/buffer size settings on the driver fixes most of these issues."

If only it were so simple. I use an 18i20 plus Octopre for 16-track recording. Results are excellent, but I simply cannot use Focusrite for playback at home. I have a powerful desktop rig which should in theory handle the task without breaking a sweat, but despite trying every suggestion I've been able to find, plus contact with customer support, I've given up.

I record on my Focusrites and use a Zoom R8 for playback.

The Scarletts are a nice series but I would not in good conscience recommend them to anybody who wants hassle-free ASIO audio.

Save your money and get the

Save your money and get the cheaper version two inputs AI.You can only record a vocal and a guitar one at the time. You only need 4 or more if you intent to have the whole live band come to your basement and they all plug their instruments into your Au.interface, and then your computer blows up in two minutes.