The Best iPad Audio Interfaces

The Highest Rated iPad Audio Interfaces

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The iPad is rapidly becoming the go-to mobile recording device for audio engineers on the go. More audio device manufacturers are seeing this and have either released iPad-specific hardware or have updated their products with class-compliant firmware for use with the iPad via a Lightning to USB adaptor.

For 2019, we have come up with an updated list of devices that truly maximize the iPad's potential to be a complete mobile recording solution. Our selections are divided into two categories: The first list contains products that utilize the iPad's proprietary lightning connection, the second list has interfaces that need Apple's Lightning to USB adapter which is sold separately.

Each type have their own pros and cons. Continue reading to learn which audio interface suits your needs best.

The Best iPad Audio Interfaces

Best iPad Audio Interfaces - Lightning Compatible

Below are the top audio interfaces for iPad that come with lightning connectivity. They allow for convenient out-of-the-box use, forgoing the need to purchase usb to lightning adapters separately.

Shure MVi

83
GEARANK

83 out of 100. Incorporating 50+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$129
Shure MVi

At time of publication, the Shure MVi was the highest rated Lightning Compatible iPad Audio Interface.

The Shure MVi is a compact and versatile audio interface that works well with different sound sources. It owes its versatility to its switchable recording mode, which lets you fine tune its Class A preamp for use with singing, acoustic instruments, speech and loud instruments. The 5th mode tunes the MVi to a basic flat setting, in case you want to go the warts and all approach. This interesting ability makes it easier for beginners to get good sounding recordings. The built-in DSP also lets you dial in dynamic and EQ settings to your preference, in case you want more control over the sound. Finally, all these features are packed well inside a solid but compact profile, making the MVi a true grab-and-go recording interface that matches the portability and flexibility of the iPad.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/48kHz
  • Connectors: Lightning (Micro-USB to Lightning)
  • Simultaneous Channels: 1
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR-1/4" Combo (Line/Hi-Z Level)
  • Outputs: 1 x 1/8" Headphones
  • Power: Bus Powered (by IOS or USB)
  • Can charge IOS unit: No
  • Phantom Power: 12V (when using iPad power), 48V when using standard USB power

Pros

The market has mostly good things to say about the Shure MVi, with many praising its good balance of portability and sound quality. Ease of use and its rugged all metal chassis also get a lot of thumbs up. Many like the MVi's form factor, saying that it is easy on the eyes, and on the pocket, both in terms of money and space. Satisfied users include singers, guitar players, podcasters, professional voice actors and more.

Cons

Note that the bundled Mini-USB to Lightning cable is not the same as standard USB to Lightning cables. This means that replacing the cable can be a bit of a hassle, thankfully there are specialized mini-USB to lightning cables available online which you can find with a bit of searching. Just make sure that you don't lose the cable and you won't have to deal with this minor issue.

Overall

The Shure MVi is a great interface for those who need good sound right away. The preset DSP per instrument helps you focus on your content rather than your settings. Get it if you need something you can grab and go. If you need more flexibility, there are other items on our list worth considering.

Focusrite iTrack Solo Lightning

82
GEARANK

82 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$130
Focusrite iTrack Solo USB Audio Interface

The Focusrite iTrack Solo Lightning is an iPad and iOS compatible audio interface that comes in mini-rack form factor. It's main selling point is its Focusrite mic preamps, which features the same quality as found on their more expensive models. The iTrack Solo Lightning is meant for the entry-level market, with its compact profile, streamlined features, and affordable price tag. As the label implies, this version comes bundled with a lightning cable, which connects it with the latest iPads out-of-the-box, in addition to connecting to Macs and PCs (via USB).

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/96kHz
  • Connectors: Lightning, USB
  • Simultaneous Channels: 2
  • Inputs:1 x XLR, 1 x 1/4" Instrument input
  • Outputs: 1 x RCA Monitor Outs, 1 x 1/4" Headphones
  • Power: USB
  • Can charge IOS unit: No
  • Phantom Power: Yes
  • Bundled Software: Ableton Live Lite, Novation's Bass Station, Focusrite Scarlett Plug-in Suite, 1GB Loopmasters Samples.

Pros

For the price, this audio interface does everything it is supposed to do, and it does all of them really well, and this is well attested to in reviews. Most of its high scores are from users who do vocal/speech related recordings. Many users also commend it for its solid build and intuitive design. With the Focusrite preamps trickled down from their higher end models, raw tracks sound pristine and lively.

Cons

There were a few who encountered clipping issues when recording guitars and other pickup-equipped instruments. Experienced users noted that gain adjustments can be a bit tricky at first, but should be a non-issue once you got the settings dialed in just right.

Overall

If you're accustomed to the sound of Focusrite preamps and want something portable, the iTrack Solo is a good pick. Even if it's your first or only interface, Focusrite's preamps have a reputation in the industry as being one of the best. If good raw tracks are what you need, get it.

TASCAM iXR 2-ch Recording Interface

80
GEARANK

80 out of 100. Incorporating 10+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$150

The Tascam iXR is the company's iPad-centric audio interface. It was designed to function as a full featured interface with 2 XLR/TRS inputs with phantom power, gain control with up to +57db of gain and latency-free monitoring.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/96kHz
  • Connectors: Lightning, USB
  • Simultaneous Channels: 2
  • Inputs:2 x XLR/TRS combo inputs
  • Outputs: 2 x TRS Monitor outs
  • Power: USB
  • Can charge IOS unit: No
  • Phantom Power: Yes
  • Bundled Software: Steinberg Cubase LE (Mac/Win) and Steinberg Cubasis LE (iOS)

Pros

Users appreciate how feature-rich it is compared to other interfaces at this price. Reviewers who are upgrading from a single channel interface like an iRig say the iXR is a good step up. Its two XLR inputs mean you can use two condenser mics at once; perfect for setting up interviews or podcasts.

Cons

Repeated concerns for the lack of a charging feature for mobile devices. This means that for continuous function, you need to keep both your mobile device and the interface plugged in. Drivers need updating out of the box.

Overall

The Tascam iXR is a good step up from using simpler audio interfaces specifically for guitar. Get it if you want a 2 XLR channel mobile interface that supports condenser mics.

Best iPad Compatible USB Audio Interfaces

These are top rated USB Audio interfaces that can work with the iPad via Apple's Lightning to USB adapter, or Camera Connection Kit. These interfaces work with the iPad because they are USB audio Class Compliant which means they don't need proprietary drivers. The standard USB adaptors won't be able to charge your iOS device and generally won't supply enough power to these interfaces so they will need their own power supply.

Yamaha AG03

91
GEARANK

91 out of 100. Incorporating 150+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$150
Yamaha AG03 3-Channel Mixer Audio Interface for iPad / Mac / PC

There's no denying Yamaha's reputation for quality and value for money, and the iPad-compatible AG03 is a great example. Far from being just another audio interface, this one comes with mixer-like functionality and multi-platform compatibility. The first channel features Yamaha's popular D-Pre mic preamp, while the second channel lets you switch between Hi-Z instruments or line level sound sources. It also comes with impressive control options including a dedicated fader for channel 1. Other features include built-in DSP effects (reverb, compression, filtering) and Loopback, which lets you broadcast via realtime online streaming platforms. Note that since the iPad cannot provide enough power for the Yamaha AG03, you'll need a USB 5V power adapter to get it running. Alternatively, you can connect the extra USB slot to a power bank for mobile use.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Connectors: USB (Requires Lightning to USB Adapter)
  • Simultaneous Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR-1/4" Combo, 1 x 1/4" Hi-Z, 2 x 1/4" Line Input
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4", 1 x Stereo RCA, 2 x 1/4" Headset
  • Features: 3-Channel Mixer Controls and i/o, DSP (EQ, Filtering, Reverb), Loopback
  • Power: Bus Powered (Requires USB Power Hub)
  • Phantom Power: 48V (Channel 1)
  • Bundled Software: Cubase AI (Mac/PC), Cubasis LE (iOS)

Pros

Reviews show that it simplifies recording, podcasting and music production setups, and that it is useful in various situations, including video streaming, podcasting, recording, and more. Many also commend its clarity and zero latency operation.

Cons

There are a few who wish for extra features, but there are no notable complaints raised.

Overall

If you are in the market for a multiplatform audio interface that doubles as a mixer, the Yamaha AG03 is highly recommended. It's familiar form factor takes very little space as well; perfect for your desktop setup.

Steinberg UR22 MK2

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 900+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$150
Steinberg UR22 MK2 USB Audio Interface for iPad, Mac and PC

The Steinberg UR22 Mk2 is a 2 in, 2 out USB 2.0 audio interface with D-PRE Class-A discrete mic preamps. Great converters and bundled Cubase AI and Cubasis LE ensures a smooth and uninterupted workflow and compatibility between software and hardware.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-Bit/192 kHz
  • Connectors: USB 2.0
  • Simultaneous Channels: 2
  • Inputs:2 x XLR/TRS Combo Jack
  • Outputs: 2 x TRS outputs
  • MIDI: I/O built in
  • Power:USB
  • Bundled Software:Cubase AI and Cubasis LE
  • Phantom Power: Yes

Pros

Users praise the unit's solid build quality which makes it great for use in mobile setups. Very few reports of the unit breaking down from continued use exist and are usually from major accidents. Many prefer the coloration of the preamps over other brands like Focusrite.

Cons

Latency settings may need tweaking to fix audio dropouts as reported by some user reviews. Comments under these reviews usually helped them solve the problems. Preamps can be noisy with higher gain and low quality cables.

Overall

If you need something physically sturdy that you can bring throughout a tour, a mobile or field recording setup or just something you can bring to a friend's to jam with, the Steinberg UR22 Mk2 is a good pick especially with the bundled software included.

Audient ID4

93
GEARANK

93 out of 100. Incorporating 225+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$199
Audient ID4 USB Audio Interface 2-in/2-out

Thanks to Audient, you can have a premium portable audio interface for under $200. The ID4 packs their class A mic preamp and JFET DI circuit into a compact and lightweight metal enclosure. It is designed to be class compliant, so it works with the iPad and other iOS devices, just as it does with Mac and Windows based computers. Since this unit is bus powered, you'll need a powered USB Hub to get it working with the iPad. Thankfully, this slight inconvenience is minor compared to the benefits of utilizing Audient quality recordings on the go. Other features include zero-latency monitoring, mix and pan controls, 2 separate headphone outputs, and a console like interface.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/96kHz
  • Connectors: USB (Requires Lightning to USB Adapter)
  • Simultaneous Channels: 2
  • Inputs: 1 x XLR-1/4" Combo (Mic/Line), 1 x 1/4" DI (Instrument)
  • Outputs: 2 x 1/4" Monitor, 1 x 1/4" Headphones, 1 x 1/8" Headphones
  • MIDI: USB
  • Power: Requires USB Power Hub or Power Bank
  • Phantom Power: 48V (Channel 1)

Pros

The Audient ID4 continues to get acclaim from users with different experience levels, including musicians, voice over artists, home studio owners and many more. Most reviewers not only praise its performance, but go as far as recommending it for small home studios, or for those who do on-site mobile recording. The sound quality received the most commendation, followed by ease of use and portability.

Cons

There are a few users who had qualms about the ID4 resetting its headphone output settings when turned off, but still praised the unit for its solid build and transparent sound.

Overall

Overall, the Audient ID4 is the ideal portable audio interface for those who want to take advantage of the iPad's mobility, without compromising sound quality.

Tascam Celesonic US-20x20

90
GEARANK

90 out of 100. Incorporating 40+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$600
Tascam Celesonic US-20x20 USB Audio Interface

The Celesonic US-20x20 is a full-featured studio-ready interface with 8 XLR preamps and iOS compatibility. It can function as an audio interface, a mic preamp or even an iPad controlled mixer.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Connectors: 8 x XLR, 2 x 1/4" TRS Ins, 2 x TRS headphones output, USB 3.0/2.0
  • Simultaneous Channels: 12 Analog (Up to 30 via ADAT)
  • Inputs:8 x XLR-1/4" combo (2 Mic/Instrument, 6 Mic/Line), 2 x 1/4" TRS, 1 x Coax (S/PDIF), 1 x Optical (S/MUX)
  • Outputs: 10 x 1/4" TRS, 2 x 1/4" (headphones), 1 x Coax (S/PDIF), 1 x Optical (S/MUX)
  • MIDI: I/O Built in
  • Power: DC Power Supply
  • Phantom Power: Yes

Pros

People who wrote reviews based on use with their mobile devices noted that using the US-20x20 was hassle-free. Recording with low buffer sizes did not introduce any dropouts. Lots of headroom from the preamps and enough power to drive most headphones.

Cons

Due to the preamps being in front, The space for the knobs may be cramped. One reviewer noted that they wished it had a meter rather than just a single light to indicate signal. Power Supply is external rather than internal and may be an issue for portability.

Overall

If you're looking to record a full band with several microphones on the go and on the cheap, the Tascam Celesonic US-20x20 is a great pick with only minor gripes.

RME Babyface Pro

96
GEARANK

96 out of 100. Incorporating 250+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$749

German manufacturer RME enters this list with its class compliant portable audio interface, the Babyface Pro. This unit comes with many interesting features that easily set it apart from the competition, most notable of which is its extended range of 76dB, which increments in 1dB steps. This extra gain allow for improved clarity and compatibility with low level microphones. Another noteworthy feature is the redesigned XLR socket, which saves space and better secures connection. Of course the ADAT toslink connection, which allows the addition of 8 input/ouput channels via an ADAT audio interface, is a key feature those who might want to expand beyond the 4 input channels initially on offer. Other features include 2 mic preamps, hi-Z (instrument) and lo-Z (line) inputs and MIDI input/output. All of these features are packed inside a compact yet solid aluminum housing that's equally at home in portable and home studio applications.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Connectors: USB (Requires Lightning to USB Adapter)
  • Simultaneous Channels: 4 (Up to 12 via ADAT)
  • Inputs: 2 x XLR, 2 x 1/4", 1 x ADAT toslink
  • Outputs: 2 x XLR, 1 x 1/4" Headphones, 1 x ADAT toslink
  • MIDI: In/Out via Breakout Cable
  • Power: DC Power Supply or USB Bus Powered
  • Bundled Software: TotalMix FX
  • Phantom Power: Yes

Pros

Market response to the RME Babyface Pro continues to be overwhelmingly positive, which is impressive considering its premium price tag. It gets most of its commendation from users who are impressed with its excellent headroom and clarity. And while many bought the RME for portable use with their iPads, it has been reported to be equally viable in home studios, especially with it premium look and space saving size.

Cons

The price tag is on the higher end for the average home studio enthusiast and mobile producer, but those who have bought the Babyface Pro found the premium cost justifiable. Having to use proprietary breakout cables were frowned upon by a few users, but they do understand that this is a necessary compromise to make the unit smaller and lighter.

Overall

If you're going for a premium audio interface that's portable, the RME Babyface Pro is a great pick that's not only easy to bring to your next recording session, jam, or gig, but also looks at home next to your minimalist home recording setup.

RME Fireface 802 USB Audio Interface

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 90+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$1999
RME Fireface 802 USB Audio Interface

The RME Fireface 802 is a premium audio interface meant for professional Firewire-based studio use, with up to 30 channels available for use along with built-in DSP features. It has 12 analog inputs, four of which feature RME's popular mic preamps, while the unit's instrument inputs add to its overall routing flexibility. As the name implies, this digital interface is primarily designed to connect to Firewire ports, but it is also compatible with USB devices like the iPad. Finally, the RME Fireface 802 allows for latency-free monitoring with built-in effects that include EQ, dynamics, reverb, and delay.

Specifications:

  • A/D Resolution: 24-bit/192kHz
  • Connectors: 1 x FireWire 400, 1 x FireWire 800, 1 x USB Type B
  • Simultaneous Channels: 12 Analog (Up to 30 via ADAT)
  • Inputs: 8 x 1/4" TRS, 4 x XLR-1/4" Combo, 2 x XLR ADAT, 1 x XLR (AES/EBI)
  • Outputs: 8 x 1/4" TRS, 2 x Optical (ADAT), 1 x XLR (AES/EBU)
  • MIDI: In/Out via Breakout Cable
  • Power: DC Power Supply
  • Bundled Software: TotalMix FX
  • Phantom Power: Yes

Pros

Overall market response continues to be positive, with users pointing to its clean and transparent sound as its best feature. A lot of users also appreciate the RME Fireface 802's connection options, which makes it viable for professional use. Satisfied reviewers come from different backgrounds, from DJs to musicians to recording engineers.

Cons

Still, the price tag is over the budget for many, but those who invested in it have nothing but good words to say about the value that it adds to their music production process.

Overall

Once again, RME delivers tasty premium goodness in the form of the Fireface 802. If you want to record multiple sound sources and don't mind sacrificing portability, the Fireface 802 is the best pick for those looking for top-tier equipment.

What to Look for in an iPad Audio Interface

  • Lightning Compatible Audio Interfaces

    While many USB audio interfaces can work with the iPad via Class Compliant mode, they require certain accessories to work and can be a bit complicated to setup. Thankfully, there are interfaces built to work directly connecting with the iPad, complete with Apple's proprietary Lightning Connectors. They are the best choice if you want to avoid the complications of having to buy adapters. Note that older iPads use older 30-pin connectors, so be sure to check whether the interface you're buying support these.

  • Class Compliant USB Audio Interfaces

    These are audio interfaces that utilize industry standard USB drivers to work, and as such they work seamlessly with multiple operating systems, including iOS. While being able to switch between your iPad and your computer is a good thing, they will require you to buy an Apple USB Camera Adapter to connect to the lightning interface on you iPad. The main accessory people use is the Apple's Lightning to USB Camera Adapter or the Apple iPad Camera Connection Kit (for older 30 pin devices). More recently the Lightning to USB 3.0 Camera Adapter has become available and although it's a bit pricier it does allow you to charge you're iPad while connected to USB which isn't possible with the other two. Note that USB interfaces generally won't be able to draw enough power via these USB adapters to operate so see the following section on power consumption.

  • Power Consumption

    The iPad is designed to limit the amount of power supplied to external devices, and while this can preserve battery life it also presents challenges for said external devices. This is the reason why most audio interfaces made specifically for the iPad required their own power, a few are even capable of charging your iPad, making them ideal for long recording sessions. Those interfaces that are 'bus powered' have to contend with the iPad's limited power so they tend to be small one channel interfaces and features like phantom power are scaled down, if not totally turned off. That said, they are the most convenient and portable options you find.

    When it comes to compatible USB interfaces connected through a lightning adapter, you will generally need another supply of power. Interfaces that are USB bus powered will usually not get enough 'bus power' via the lightning adapter to function. This is where interfaces that can use their own power supply come in handy. The solution for interfaces that can only be USB 'bus powered' is to use a powered USB hub and although this works it does add another box and cable to your setup which can reduce the portability and convenience of the setup. Check out the video below on how to connect bus powered interfaces with the iPad:

     

     

     

  • Input Compatibility

    If you're planning to record vocals and other instruments, you'll want one that comes with both 1/4" and XLR inputs. Note that electric guitars, basses and other instruments require a higher impedance than line level inputs even though they use the same 1/4" connection. So look out for connections or switches labelled 'Instrument' or 'Hi-Z' to see if an interface can handle these properly. A workaround for this is to use a DI Box before going into the audio interface. Another important consideration is 48V phantom power capability, which is the standard when you're planning to use condenser microphones. Some interfaces also provide ADAT connections to allow you to add up to 8 extra tracks via a separate ADAT audio interface.

  • Mic Preamp Quality

    Thankfully, many of today's affordable audio interfaces come with the same mic preamps as their expensive counterparts. This means that even in the entry level market, you are getting really good sound quality. If you're looking for tried and tested preamps, brands like Focusrite, Audient, Yamaha and more have iPad friendly interfaces that provide top notch sound recording, worthy of being included in the final mix.

Best iPad Audio Interface Selection Methodology

This guide was first published on February 18, 2016 written by Alexander Briones. The latest major update was published on October 30, 2019 written by recording engineer Raphael Pulgar with contributions from Alexander Briones.

For this update, we looked at best sellers and top rated iPad compatible audio interfaces, including those that are compatible with Apple's Lightning cable, and those that are class compliant - iOS compatible. We ended up with a slightly longer list of viable interfaces, which resulted in us gathering over 7,900 relevant sources that included reviews, ratings, forum discussions and similar feedback sources. All these data were then fed to the Gearank algorithm to give us the scores that we used to identify the best audio interfaces that are worth recommending. We divided the list into Lightning Compatible and iPad Compatible USB sections. For more information about this process see How Gearank Works.

Comments

I'm noticing there arn't any

I'm noticing there arn't any two-channel bus powered interfaces on this list. Are there any out there? I'm at the end of my wits looking for one.

It might be the case that IOS

It might be the case that IOS does't provide enough power for a good two-channel microphone interface via the connection. A few years ago they reduced the power available to USB devices via the adaptor and they don't publicly specify how much power is available for lightning / 30 pin connector.

The only IOS bus powered interface on this list is the Shure MVi which is mono. The best option to get stereo may be to go for something that can be battery powered like the Roland Duo-Capture EX.

Yes, I tend to agree. The

Yes, I tend to agree. The iPad just doesn't have enough "juice" for bus-powering a stereo interface. Personally, I'd be too worried to rely solely on bus power during a recording. I always feel better knowing that I'm plugged into the "wall." If I needed to record something in the field where there were no electrical outlets I would probably use something like a portable "Zoom" recorder or something like that.

meanwhile there is a 'bus

Meanwhile there is a 'bus powered' apple usb camera adapter you can use in connection with audio interfaces. I do this. Works well.

I'd like to find out is if

I'd like to find out is if these audio devices allow song cueing for DJs. Many iPad DJ apps allow you to cue up / listen to song on the headphones separately from the main - but unfortunately it seems like lot of the good iOS compatible audio hardware doesn't support this feature.

(Mainly just need an audio interface without silly turntables on them)

Audio interfaces with three

Audio interfaces with three or more output channels should be compatible with cue mixing. Three because you need two channels for stereo output, and one (or two for stereo) for the headphones. This should work if the DJ app lets you send the cue and main audio to separate output channels.

The Behringer U-Phoria UMC204HD has four output channels and is very affordable. You can also look at our multi-channel audio interface guide for more options.

Hi.

Hi.
Any interface for iPad which offers 8 analog outputs?
Thanks,
Flavio.

Get the Zoom U-24. Works

Get the Zoom U-24. Works great as a USB/battery-powered 2-channel audio interface, and works great as a stand-along mixer, mic preamp and DJ cueing interface. It can't understand why it's not on this list. Best product I've ever bought.

The Zoom U-24 did not have

The Zoom U-24 didn't have sufficient ratings to make it onto our short-list when we did the research for this guide.

I've had a quick look at the latest ratings and written reviews are mostly positive so it might make a good DJ interface.

Have you seen the DPA d:vice?

Have you seen the DPA d:vice? That thing is 96k 24 bit and bus powered 2 condensers. And it’s DPA, their mics are the best in the world!

I know FocusRite doesn't make

Two questions:
1) I understand that FocusRite doesn't recommend the 'bigger' iPad Pro users connect to this via the adapter, but what defines 'bigger'?

2) If 9.7" is too big, I can't use this, which begs the question: What else out there is compatible AND pro-level quality for a 9.7" iPad Pro?

Have just bought the UMC204HD

Have just bought the UMC204HD and plugged it into my iPad Pro 10.5” using the Apple lightning to USB 3 adapter which has both USB and lightning sockets so you can supply power at same time. It powered up the UMC204HD and the iPad recognised it immediately, no warnings. Opened Auria Pro, all working perfectly (still had to set the iPad volume first, as reported). The iPad was charging as well. Don’t know if there’s anything different with the iPad 10.5 like if it has more power ability but this is perfect for me. Don’t need a powered usb hub, no mess of excess cables. Happy bunny, me!

I am wanting to do a Podcast

I am wanting to do a Podcast using
Garageband and want an option for a 3rd mic. Would the Behringer UMC404hd connect the same way? Also in Garageband would it be recorded as one track or separate for each mics I have? Thanks!!

Follow up question regarding

Follow up question regarding above mentioned products. Is there a way to connect a cell phone to the 404HD to do interviews?

I haven't done this myself,

I haven't done this myself, but cell phones typically have a jack for plugging in headsets, usually earbuds with a mic, and you could plug that into any audio interface including the UMC404HD.

You will need an adapter to convert the output from your phone, typically a 1/8" TRRS (Tip Ring Ring Sleeve) socket, to a 1/4" TRS (Tip Ring Sleeve) to plug into your audio interface. Different phones can have different TRRS configurations so you'll need an adapter that's specific to your phone.

Hopefully last question. I

Hopefully last question. I bought the UMC404HD, connected to iPad and use Garageband. Recording works well but I cannot hear what I have recorded on playback through the headphones connected to interface. Thoughts on how to correct?

Hello Lenny,

Hello Lenny,

Have you ensured that the Phones knob is set correctly on the interface? Also if you want to use the interface as your playback, you'll have to set the audio output accordingly within the app. Hope this helps!

I am actually irritated at

I am actually irritated at the lack of research and incompleteness of this article. None of Presonus’s iOS interfaces are represented here. In my opinion, they are hands down the best mobile interface. They are high quality I/O converters, lightning compatable, and will trickle charge. I do not represent, work for, or am endorsed by Presonus. I am a musician hobbyist, with a passion for great gear.

Hi Dan,

Hi Dan,

I can understand you making the mistake of thinking we haven't researched PreSonus audio interfaces in detail, because you probably didn't realize you could have looked that information up in our Music Gear Database.

Here are several PreSonus interfaces that have been placed onto short-lists for detailed analysis when we have researched various audio interface categories - as you can see the PreSonus AudioBox iTwo simply doesn't have high enough ratings for us to recommend it at this time.

Jason.

No mistake. Please allow me

No mistake, Jason. Please allow me to explain. Based on the Gearank article you sited, the iTwo is ranked 83 with over 3x the amount of sources as the top listed lightning compatable interface. The iOne is an even closer competitor, at a lower price point with more features. Furthermore, I don’t know where your “lack of ratings” is coming from. Gearank’s OWN RATING SYSTEM invalidate your statement. Since the inception of gearank’s article in early 2016, the Presonus ratings for their iOS devices have greatly increased on respectable user ranked based platforms, specifically the iOne which has more reviews than the top competitor. My position is firm. I continue to find fult in this incomplete article. I am simply stating the facts. This article calls for an update. I find the “update” earlier this year to be partial.

Hi Dan, you are clearly very

Hi Dan, you are clearly very passionate about interfaces from PreSonus and that's a good thing because if everyone had the same opinion on everything then life would be boring and music would be dull.

What I meant about the ratings was that the iTwo has lower ratings than the ones we recommended - that was the same for the iOne which didn't make it onto our short-list because a quick analysis showed the ratings would come out too low for us to recommend it before we did the extra work of publishing a rating for it.

Keep in mind that the ratings we publish are a statistical measure of the overall market satisfaction with a product and as a result some of the sources we have used will have higher ratings while others will have lower ratings for a single item. If you have written reviews, posted forum comments or rated those interfaces (on sites other than Gearank.com) then it's quite likely that your opinion has contributed to the ratings we publish.

Please feel free to post a follow-up and tell us what those respected sources are that you mentioned, and if by some chance they aren't already in our sample set, I'll ensure they are considered next time we update our recommendations.

I am thinking about to buy a

I am thinking about to buy a Behringer UMC 204HD but I would like to know if it can be connected to iPhone 6S instead of iPad. For example i would like to record a video from my iPhone Camera but audio from my condenser microphone MXL/990 plugged into UMC 204 HD and connected to iPhone via CCK cable. Because if it does not work I will buy a iRig pro Duo.

Tks

I ended up buying a Roland

I ended up buying a Roland Duo Capture EX, that works fine with ipad/iphone as well with PC.

Anyone tried connecting

Anyone tried connecting behringer umc204hd to iPad with lightning camera adaptor and made it work to send audio from interface to iPad in garage band?

In response to the power

In response to the power consumption part more specifically that video about how to using powered bus hubs. Couldn’t you in theory just plug the interface and wall outlet into the camera adapter. And then obviously the camera adapter into the iOS device. By passing or simply not using the usb powered hub?

I use the apple composite A/V

I use the apple composite A/V cable and a 30 pin/lightning convertor to run audio into my mixer. The A/V cable has L and R stereo RCA out that sends the line level audio to my mixer. It also has a USB in the same bundle. Connecting that to power via an AC transformer allows line level sound and charging simultaneously. Note that the ipad volume controls will not function in this setup. I adapt the cables to 1/4" for insertion into the mixer.

Nice work here, thank you.

Nice work here, thank you.

I imagine the list is missing iConnectivity's iConnectAudio4+ interface because of some bad reviews (~68% on amazon and sweetwater, though most are 5-star on both...) but wonder if should get an "Honorable Mention" or "YMMV" slot at the bottom of this list because of its particular feature set for iOS musicians. In addition to regular 4 channel audio and MIDI IO... It's Lightning Compatible. You can plug two iOS devices and a computer in at the same time. It will actually charge the iOS devices while in use. You can route audio and MIDI back and forth between any of the connected devices internally. It has a USB host port which can be connected to a hub allowing for up to 8 additional USB devices to be hooked up.

The preamps ain't Apogee or RME but they're plenty good and certainly on or above par with the other items listed here.

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with iConnectivity in any way other than I gave them money and love the interface. :)

iConnectivity is very

Thank you Will for both your suggestion and for stating your reasons so clearly.

iConnectivity is a very reliable brand when it comes to MIDI and they dominate the recommendations in our guide to The Best MIDI Interfaces.

Also, the iConnectAudio4+ (rating info) has some serious supporters in addition to you including; Music Radar - Jono Buchanan and Ask Audio - Matt Vanacoro.

However, a vast number of individual users have given it a rating equivalent of well less than 4 stars in their reviews and comments and that has dragged down the overall rating for the iConnectAudio4+. Alexander, the lead researcher and author of this guide, informed me that his investigation showed there were a large number of plug-and-play / compatibility issues, meaning that if it worked it was great, but for those that had problems getting it working, well - they gave low ratings in response.

Thank you again for the suggestion, however until solutions to the compatibility issues are reflected in user experiences, we won't be comfortable giving it a featured position in this guide.

Does the new iPad Pro’s

Does the new iPad Pro’s rumoured USB-C connection make hooking up my audient ID4 an even more attractive option compared to recording separately with say the Zoom F4?

I'd say that's partly a

I'd say that's partly a matter of personal preference and what kind of recording you're doing.

For example the Zoom F4 is good for field recordings when you're shooting videos, would you be comfortable using an iPad Pro on location?

If you mainly intend to record music, then in the long run you'll find using a good interface like the ID4 in conjunction with software will make recording, editing and mixing both more convenient and flexible.

I'd like to use my Ipad with

I'd like to use my Ipad with my guitar so thinking . . . Xvive wireless from guitar to "some interface device" to Ipad through a lightning cable. Can I then use bluetooth headphones?
Please suggest a method so that I'm "wireless/bluetooth" to my Ipad
Thank you

Bacon Sandwich! The irig hd

Bacon Sandwich! The irig hd 2 is NOT mobile friendly. You cannot output through ipad speakers, headphones or external amp only. And, for me, it's a major complaint. So, there you go, at least 1 major complaint for the irig HD 2...

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