The Best Studio Mics For Vocals - $100 to $1000

The Highest Rated Studio Mics For Vocals

Disclosure

We recommend all products independently of 3rd parties including advertisers. We earn advertising fees from:
• • • • •
Sweetwater
• • • • •

Amazon

As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
• • • • •

Once you reach a certain point in your exploration of music production, you will start to feel the limitations of your starter gear. Using a less-than-optimal vocal mic makes you do more things during mixing and inevitably gives you an inconsistent sound, especially with vocals.

Everyone's voice is different. This means that one mic may not be optimal or comfortable for any given singer to use. Using a mic that alters the singer's voice in an undesirable way may get in the way of getting good performances.

Having a great vocal mic enables singers to perform better, and fit in the mix better with fewer adjustments in post.

Looking to expand your microphone collection? Or maybe looking for a great, all-rounder mic for your needs? This guide has you covered.

In this April 2021 edition, we feature pro studio favorites as well as industry newcomers. We limited the price range to exclude both ultra-budget mics and boutique/limited/custom offerings from manufacturers (if you're looking for budget mics check out our guide to Condenser Mics Under $100).

Note that while the main consideration is vocal recording, many of the mics we feature below also work really well with instruments, making them a good value addition to any studio setup.

The Best Studio Mics For Recording Vocals

Author & Contributors

Raphael PulgarRaphael Pulgar

An audio engineer of nearly 20 years who specializes in rock and metal recordings, he also plays guitar and produces original music for his band and other content creators.

Best Studio Microphones Under $200

We found three condenser microphones in the $100 - $200 price range that are worthy of our recommendation. They are listed below along with important details as to why users were satisfied with their performance.

Audio-Technica AT2035

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 1850+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$149
Audio-Technica AT2035 Large-Diaphragm Condenser Microphone

Don't be fooled by the budget pricing of the AT2035.

It is a large diaphragm condenser microphone with premium features. Aside from its metal exterior, it comes bundled with a custom shock mount.

It has proven to be very popular with project studios, voice-over work and streaming.

In addition to vocal recording, this mic can also work with other sound sources, thanks to its higher than average maximum SPL of 148dB, -10dB pad and its switchable low-frequency roll off.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 120 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 148 dB
  • Power Requirements: 11V to 52V DC, 3.8 mA typical

Pros

The Audio-Technica AT2035 continues to garner positive reviews, with many describing it as a great value microphone. Commonly reported is the clarity and detail that this mic captures, with some even comparing it to more expensive studio mics. Its overall solid feel and metal exterior also got a lot of mentions from happy reviewers. And while most are using this mic for recording vocals, many have reported satisfaction when using the mic with various instruments, including violins and acoustic guitars.

Cons

There are a few complaints that point to its accessories, or the lack thereof, some complained that the package did not come with an XLR cable, while others found the quality of the pop filter to be unsatisfactory.

Overall

If budget is tight and you're looking for a quality microphone that can handle vocal recording well, and versatile enough to work with acoustic instruments, then get the Audio-Technica AT2035.

sE Electronics X1 S Vocal Pack

95
GEARANK

95 out of 100. Incorporating 100+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$199
sE Electronics X1 S Vocal Pack

The sE Electronics X1 S Vocal pack includes a shockmount and a pop filter.

The X1 S mic itself has a custom, handcrafted capsule made in-house by sE Electronics.

The custom transformerless circuit allows up to 160dB Maximum SPL thanks to its -10 and -20dB pads.

A switchable low cut filter offers two cutoffs at 80hz and 160hz. This makes the mic ideal for use with loud sound sources.

Lastly the mic is enclosed in an durable all-metal housing.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 125 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 160dB SPL (with pads)
  • Power Requirements:48V phantom power

Pros

The sE Electronics X1 S is noted by many users to be "musical" with just the right amount of harmonics to strike a balance between harmonic richness and transparency. They also mention the price to performance ratio, as well as the build quality to be excellent. Having a high maximum SPL also enables use for louder sound sources like aggressive vocals as well as instruments.

Cons

The mic is a bit heavy; best to pair it with a solid Mic Stand.

Overall

Whether you're getting it as a first mic or your next mic, the X1 S Vocal Pack is a great all-rounder for your studio

TZ Audio Products Stellar X2

96
GEARANK

96 out of 100. Incorporating 900+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$200
Stellar X2 Large Diaphragm Cardioid Condenser Microphone

At publication time this was the Highest Rated Studio Vocal Mic from $100 to $200.

TechZone (or TZ) Audio Products is somewhat of a lesser-known name in the recording community.

Earning a reputation in many gear circles as a hidden gem, the Stellar X2 is a modern condenser microphone with a sound that's tuned to eliminate the usual "harsh treble" sound found on cheaper condenser microphones.

The "k67" style capsule is constructed with high quality Japanese Mylar, and gold sputtered using the company's proprietary tech.

The circuitry is rounded out by a transformerless JFET circuit with up to 1% tolerance between components.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz - 18kHz
  • Impedance: 140 Ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 130dB
  • Power Requirements: 48V Phantom Power ±4

Pros

Users love the warm and smooth sound, noting that this tonality usually cannot be found with mics at this price point. Seasoned engineers praise the Stellar X2 for its build quality and those that opened up the mic to inspect the componentry note their high quality.

Cons

Some found the warm sound to be dull and bloated the low midrange frequencies of baritone vocals.

Overall

The TZ Audio Products Stellar X2 is a mic with a great price to performance ratio. Get it if you want a mic to warm up higher pitched or sibilant voices as well as give a nice midrange push to instruments should you need it.

Best Studio Microphones Under $500

This price range is where manufacturers can really drive the quality up while balancing cost, resulting in high quality mics that are still reasonably priced, as reflected by their high ratings. Even professionals find some of the mics in this bracket to be of great quality.

Shure SM7B

98
GEARANK

98 out of 100. Incorporating 4550+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$399
The Shure SM7B Studio Dynamic Vocal Microphone

At publication time this was the Highest Rated Studio Vocal Mic from $200 to $500.

The Shure SM7B is a dynamic microphone originally designed for radio broadcast.

Among its famous users include Michael Jackson, who preferred using the original SM7 on his vocal takes for Thriller.

Modern musicians and producers have found that the SM7B sounds great on aggressive, screamed vocals and distorted electric guitar.

While featuring a similar capsule as their famed Shure SM57/58, the SM7's designers were given freedom to alter it during the design process. Their end goals were a deeper low frequency response, an internal shockmount and an enclosure tuned to accentuate more low end.

After decades of iterations, including the SM7A in 1999 which introduced a hum-cancelling coil and a different yoke mount, the SM7B was introduced in 2001 featuring a new windscreen.

Features:

  • Type: Dynamic
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 50 to 20,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 150 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 150++ dB
  • Bass roll-off control
  • Mid-range emphasis / Presence boost control
  • Power Requirements: None

Pros

Because it was tuned as a broadcast mic, voice recordings made with the SM7B sound sublime and barely need any additional processing to sound good in a mix. This is supported by multiple users who found that getting the SM7B changed their recording and mixing experience. Legends aside, the mic performs well with both clean vocals and screams. In addition to vocals, the SM7B performs well with distorted electric guitar.

Cons

The mic is famously noted for requiring an audio interface or preamp that can provide at least 60dB of gain, otherwise the mic can be too quiet.

Overall

With decades of legacy behind it, the SM7B lives up to its legend as a "do-all" microphone that performs excellent on voices and instruments.

Sennheiser MD 421-II

96
GEARANK

96 out of 100. Incorporating 450+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$400
Sennheiser MD421 Dynamic Instrument Microphone

A successor to Sennheisers popular MD 421 mic, the MD 421-II builds upon its predecessor's high SPL handling, enabling it to be used on percussion, loud guitar amplifiers and other high volume sound sources like aggressive vocals.

While it excels in loud sounds, it can also be incredibly nuanced thanks to its large diaphragm for a dynamic microphone.

The MD 421-II features a five-position bass roll-off switch for versatile low frequency handling.

Features:

  • Type: Dynamic
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 30Hz-17kHz
  • Impedance: 200 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 150 dB+
  • Power Requirements: none

Pros

The MD 421-II a favorite of many engineers for distorted electric guitar and aggressive vocals. The high SPL handling coupled with the neutral sound signature makes for heavy guitars that just sit right in a mix. This also goes for screamed vocals, which usually distort other mics. For drums, the MD 421-II is noted by users to bring out well-tuned toms and more dynamic playing styles.

Cons

Mic tends to fall off the standard mounting clip.

Overall

For anything loud, from singers, to electric guitar to drums, the MD 421-II is a great and versatile choice.

Electro-Voice RE20

97
GEARANK

97 out of 100. Incorporating 600+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$449
Electro Voice RE-20 Dynamic Cardioid Microphone

The Electro Voice RE-20 is a large diaphragm dynamic mic that features "Variable-D" technology, which stops it from over-emphasizing the lows when used up-close - in other words, it counters the proximity effect.

This feature allows for clear vocal recordings, which propelled its popularity among professional voice-over and broadcast circles. Its attenuation of the proximity effect enables singers to get up close with the mic for intimate sounding vocals without overloading the low frequencies.

Interestingly, it is also good enough for rock style vocals, since it is Radiohead vocalist Thom Yorke's preferred mic.

There's also a bass tilt down switch that further helps with bass attenuation, which makes the RE-20 viable for miking louder sources like guitar and bass amps, as well as kick drums.

Features:

  • Type: Dynamic
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: (-3dB) 45Hz-18kHz
  • Impedance: 150 ohms
  • Power Requirements: None

Pros

The Electro-Voice RE20 is described by many as an industry standard broadcast mic, citing its great balance of reliability and sound quality as its best traits. A good number of singers/vocalists commended the mic for working well in both live performance and studio recording settings. Beautiful sounding, magical and astounding are just a few of the many positive descriptions that continue to pour in from various users.

Cons

Price remains a barrier to entry and a deterrent for fear of maintenance woes. A few users also complained of the lack of bass, but this is expected since this mic is designed to deal with the extra bass that regular mics capture.

Overall

For intimate sounding vocals, none perform better than the RE-20. Especially with 2020 seeing a trend in whispery vocal styles similar to Billie Eilish, the RE-20's ability to capture close sound sources allows great sounding takes.

sE Electronics T2

96
GEARANK

96 out of 100. Incorporating 20+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$499
sE Electronics T2 Multi-pattern Large-diaphragm Condenser Microphone

The sE Electronics T2 was designed with a titanium sputtered capsule for better transient reproduction with percussion but is equally at home with rhythmic vocals like rap.

Because of the fast transient response, nuances like articulate, fast vocal runs in singing, rapping and speech get preserved.

The high SPL handling thanks to its pad switch also enable it to be used with aggressive vocals and loud percussion.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid, Supercardioid, Figure 8, Omni
  • Frequency Response: 20 Hz - 20 kHz
  • Impedance: 50 Ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 122/132/142 dB (0/-10/-20 dB pad)
  • Power Requirements: 48V phantom

Pros

Many users bought the mic as a drum and bass microphone but quickly discovered it to be great for capturing vocal nuances as well. Its neutral sound signature and fast transients also enable it to be used to capture acoustic guitars equally well. This versatility makes it great for singer-songwriters. Multiple pickup patterns were seen as a plus alongside the multiple pad levels.

Cons

There were no reported major cons with the T2. Lower ratings were given by those that preferred different mics for their purposes.

Overall

The sE Electronics T2 is most often purchased as an instrument mic. However, it does equally well in capturing articulations for spoken word, rap and more nuanced singing.

Best Studio Microphones Under $1000

This price range is where the budget boundaries of home recording and professional studios overlap, resulting in premium quality mics that are ready for professional use, while still somewhat reasonable enough for home recording studios to invest in.

Neumann TLM 102

97
GEARANK

97 out of 100. Incorporating 475+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$699
Neumann TLM102 Studio Microphone with Standmount

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Studio Vocal Mic from $500 to $1000 along with the Shure KSM42/SG and Warm Audio WA-47.

The TLM102 gives you Neumann's brand of quality build and sound at a more accessible price point, thanks to its relatively smaller profile and streamlined design.

This mic houses a large-diaphragm condenser capsule and it features a transformerless capacitor. This combination is more often seen on their more expensive offerings.

To make it wallet friendly, the Neumann TLM 102 comes with a single Cardioid pattern with no extra features. This limits its versatility, but makes it easier to work with since there are no settings to mess with.

It is especially designed for vocal recording with its slight emphasis on the mids.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 50 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 144 dB
  • Power Requirements: 48V phantom power

Pros

The Neumann TLM 102 continues to exceed the expectations of many, from home studio owners to professionals with big recording studios. It gets a lot of compliments for both its solid build and sonic clarity. Some experienced engineers even hail it as the best way to enter into the world of high-end microphones. It's compact size also gets a lot of thumbs up. Paul White of Sound on Sound said, "The new TLM102 embodies everything we've come to expect from a large-diaphragm Neumann studio mic — except the price!".

Cons

There are a few people who are not too happy with its streamlined design, especially when considering that there are cheaper ones with more features.

Overall

Balancing great specifications with great build quality is uncommon at this price point. While the TLM 102 trades versatility for specificity, it does its job exceptionally well. It makes a great mic to have as a first foray into higher end tonalities; granted you've developed an ear for the finer nuances these mics bring to your tracks.

Shure KSM42/SG

97
GEARANK

97 out of 100. Incorporating 20+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$799
Shure KSM42 Large-diaphragm Condenser Microphone

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Studio Vocal Mic from $500 to $1000 along with the Neumann TLM 102 and Warm Audio WA-47.

The Shure KSM42/SG is a package consisting of the KSM42 mic with a shockmount, pop filter, carrying case and pouch.

The KSM42 by itself is a mic designed to have a large "sweet spot" and consistent tone within that sweet spot.

Its dual diaphragm design has an active, side address diaphragm for capturing sound and a passive, low frequency cancelling diaphragm to negate bass buildup from the proximity effect.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 60Hz-20kHz
  • Impedance: 147 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 139dB
  • Power Requirements: +48V phantom power

Pros

A few users noted that the mic is easy to overlook because of Shure's more famous offerings. The KSM42 is noted to record vocals that just "sit right" in the mix. Users that do voice-over work, voice acting and audiobook readings found that the mic does have a large sweet spot, making for more consistent captures of even the most animated readings. Users note that it's one of the best "sleeper/best kept secret" vocal mics in the market today.

Cons

We couldn't find any major cons though we did observe that some demos start to drive the preamp too hot.

Overall

For voice overs, energetic singing and speaking deliveries and streaming/broadcast, the KSM42 is a consistent sounding microphone with a wide sweet spot.

United Studio Technologies UT FET47

96
GEARANK

96 out of 100. Incorporating 5+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$799
United Studio Technologies UT FET47 Large-diaphragm FET Condenser Microphone

The original Neumann U47 FET (Field Effect Transistor) was introduced in 1969 when the VF14 tube used in the impedance conversion of the U47 was discontinued. After a decades-long run, Neumann ceased production in 1986. While Neumann issued a "collectors edition" in 2015, it was, and still is very expensive.

Enter: United Studio Technologies.

While the company was initially familiar only to forum-dwellers and select discussion groups, they have slowly gathered a reputation for (currently) its sole product: the UT FET47.

The UT FET47 is a modern, relatively affordable recreation of the Neumann classic with custom designed transformer and capsule, vintage capacitors and NOS (New Old Stock) transistors.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20Hz-20kHz
  • Impedance: 160 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 136 dB
  • Power Requirements: 48V phantom power

Pros

Sound on Sound's Neil Rogers notes that the UT FET47 "sounds almost identical to its inspiration". On vocals, the UT FET47 sounds smooth but not muffled according to multiple users. Higher frequency harmonics populate the upper registers of the frequency spectrum instead of harsh treble that is usually found on cheaper microphones. One user noted that for intimate sounding vocals, very few sound better at the price point.

Cons

There were no consistently reported negatives that we could find at this price point.

Overall

With the Neumann originals starting at over $4000, the United Studio Technologies puts the sound of the iconic U47 FET within reach of many audio engineers.

Warm Audio WA-47

97
GEARANK

97 out of 100. Incorporating 175+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$899
Warm Audio WA-47 Large-Diaphragm Tube Condenser Microphone

At publication time this was the Equal Highest Rated Studio Vocal Mic from $500 to $1000 along with the Neumann TLM 102 and Shure KSM42/SG.

The warm Audio WA-47 is modeled after the sought-after tube microphone, the Neumann U47.

The WA-47 was designed after two vintage examples. Since the componentry of the originals are no longer made, the WA-47 was tweaked to sound close to the references with modern, more consistent components.

The capsule is a faithful recreation of the original's k47 capsule. Warm Audio made it a point not to skimp on this part due to how much it shapes the overall sound of the microphone.

Features:

  • Type: Tube Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid, Figure 8, Omni + 6 in between patterns
  • Frequency Response:20 Hz~20 KHz
  • Impedance: 200 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 140dB
  • Power Requirements: Power Supplied via External IEC Grounded PSU

Pros

Users note that the WA-47 makes their other mics feel like "toys". The premium build quality is the first thing they noticed. Plugged into a preamp, the WA-47 on vocals sounded sweet and almost "pre-processed" in a good way, like going through a good, transparent signal chain according to one user. Upon comparisons with mics like the Shure SM7B and SM57, the WA-47 rounds out the highs without making it muffled and was noted to sound more "natural" while preserving incredible detail.

Cons

Some came shipped with broken/malfunctioning tubes. To ensure proper shipping and handling as well as returns, order from reputable sellers.

Overall

The Warm Audio WA-47 is an affordable alternative to the boutique reproductions of the beloved Neumann U47. Almost ten times more affordable than modern reproductions like the Telefunken version at over $8000, the WA-47 makes great tube microphone sound more accessible to all.

Author's Pick

Every now and then, we come across a piece of gear that represents either a sleeper pick or a great value buy. In this case, the next microphone is below our lower price threshold but is too good as an entry level vocal mic not to include. This Sub-$100 mic made a buzz in several recording and streaming communities for its great value for performance.

Rode PodMic

92
GEARANK

92 out of 100. Incorporating 1650+ ratings and reviews.

Street Price: 

$99
Rode PodMic Cardioid Dynamic Microphone

While people may dismiss the PodMic as simply a streaming / podcasting microphone, at its core it is a broadcast quality mic tuned to make voices sound good.

In many ways, it is similar to how the Shure SM7/SM7B was intended to be a broadcast mic but quickly found its way onto hit records like "Thriller" to name one.

The PodMic features an internal filter and internal shock mount for plosive-free recordings.

Features:

  • Type: Condenser
  • Polar Pattern: Cardioid
  • Frequency Response: 20 to 20,000 Hz
  • Impedance: 120 ohms
  • Maximum SPL: 148 dB
  • Power Requirements: 11V to 52V DC, 3.8 mA typical

Pros

While it is indeed a Podcasting/Streaming mic, many users found it as an affordable alternative to the Shure SM7B. Vocals done with the Rode Podmic exhibit the same low frequency weight to the voices recorded as well as a good, almost' pre-processed high frequency range without sibilance. Metal producers have found the PodMic to handle aggressive vocals and screaming just as well as the community favorite SM7B, stating it to be an affordable alternative.

Cons

Many found it to be a heavy microphone that tilted their stands. A good Mic Stand alleviates this issue.

Overall

Sometimes products are advertised in a way that narrows down their niche. In this case, the Rode PodMic gets categorized as a podcast/voiceover microphone. Audio engineers that looked beyond the marketing saw a versatile and high-quality dynamic microphone for singing and screaming. If you're a metal producer on a budget, the Rode PodMic is a sleeper hit!

Things to Consider When Buying a Microphone for Recording Vocals

  • Diaphragm Type: Condenser vs Dynamic

    Condenser mics continue to be staple equipment for recording vocals, but don't brush off dynamic mics just yet because even pros opt to use them for certain scenarios. While the boundaries can be blurred from time to time, the general idea is that condenser mics capture more sonic detail at the expense of having limited sound pressure handling, while dynamic mics can handle louder sources and have better noise rejection. The safest and most versatile of the two would be the condenser, but if you're into recording loud sound sources, or full band performances, then getting a dynamic one is the better choice. Note that condenser mics usually require phantom power or their own power supply to work, while dynamic mics usually don't need any kind of mic preamp or power supply. If budget permits, it is recommended to get one of each so you have a go-to mic for virtually any type of vocal recording.

  • Polar Pattern

    Polar patterns describe how a mic captures sound; to be more specific, the location and direction of the sound relative to the mic's position. Cardioid, with its front capture and rear rejection is the most commonly used for vocal recording. Other patterns like the Figure 8 and Omnidirectional allow more of the ambient sound to be captured, and can also be used for recording a singing group or multiple sound sources. For further information on Polar Patterns see the article The Different Types Of Mics And Their Uses.

  • Frequency Response

    This specification indicates how strongly a mic responds to various frequencies, usually shown in the form of a chart to show the specific frequencies that are emphasized and de-emphasized. The resulting sound should ideally be as neutral and flat as possible, however there are who prefer subtle coloration like additional warmth and low-end. Singers with a low pitched voice will appreciate those with strong frequencies below 200Hz, since they can reproduce the tone of their voice better. On the other hand, you'll want one that can tame some of the highs if your voice tends to be naturally high-pitched. The more familiar you are with the voice that you're recording, the more useful the frequency charts will be to you, and this is the reason why professional studios have multiple mics to accommodate various voice types. A good rule of thumb is to start with a flat EQ and make adjustments as necessary before switching mics.

  • Pop Filter

    Pop filters are essentially "wind screens" that stop excessive air movement while allowing sound to pass through. Sudden air movements from strong "p" pronunciations (AKA plosives) can cause unwanted volume jumps or worse cause signal clipping, which is unwanted in a recording setting. Many mics come with bundled pop filters - but some have expressed concerns about the quality of some of these free filters. More expensive condenser mics have pop-filters built into the casing itself for convenient pop and noise protection.

  • Max SPL (Sound Pressure Level) and Attenuation Pads

    This indicates the maximum volume, measured in decibels (dB), that you can expose a mic to before it starts to distort the signal. This is not a primary concern for vocal recording, but if you want an all-around mic that you can use for louder instruments like drums and amplifiers, then you'll want to look for those with a high Max SPL. Many of the mics mentioned in this guide feature switchable attenuation pad(s), which allows them to handle louder sound sources without distorting the sound. In line with this, an SPL meter is a good tool to have, even for home studios. You can either download an SPL meter app for your smartphone or buy a hardware SPL Meter for more accurate measurements.

  • Power Source - Phantom Power

    Most audio interfaces, mic preamps and studio mixing desks today provide phantom power, but in case you have an old one that doesn't you'll need a separate mic preamp or a channel strip that can supply power to condenser mics. Note that there are some condenser mics that can't run on phantom power, rather they have dedicated power supply to feed them with the power they need, which is usually the case for tube driven mics. Dynamic mics don't usually require any power so no need to worry if you're going that route.

  • Mic Versatility

    While the main focus of this guide is for recording vocals, many of the mics that are listed here also work well with other instruments. Dynamic mics with their high max SPL will usually work well with loud instruments like drums and speaker cabinets, while condenser mics record acoustic guitar and other acoustic instruments just as well. An idea is to consider other instruments that you will also record, and get vocal mics that will also work with them to get more out of the money you're paying.

Best Studio Mic for Vocals Selection Methodology

The first edition was published in 2016 and the current edition was published on April 12, 2021.

Our goal is to feature the best studio microphones that can be readily bought from online American music equipment retailers. As such our initial short list featured 55 popular and top rated mics that are currently being sold in the USA from brands including AKG, Aston Microphones, Audio-Technica, Audix, Austrian Audio, Avantone Pro, Behringer, Earthworks Audio, Electro-Voice, Golden Age Project, Heil Sound, Lauten Audio, Miktek, Mojave Audio, Neumann, PreSonus, Rode, sE Electronics, Sennheiser, Shure, Slate Digital, Studio Projects, Techzone Audio Products, United Studio Technologies, Warm Audio.

We then compiled all relevant ratings, reviews, forum discussions and expert recommendations, which for this update tallied to over 22,600 rating sources. All of these were then processed via the Gearank Algorithm, which gave us the rating scores out of 100 that we used to select the top rated for three specific price ranges: sub $200, sub $500, and sub $1000. For more information about our methods see How Gearank Works.

About the Author and Contributors

Here are the key people and sources involved in this guide's production - click on linked names for information about their music industry backgrounds.

Lead Author & Researcher

Raphael PulgarRaphael Pulgar

An audio engineer of nearly 20 years who specializes in rock and metal recordings, he also plays guitar and produces original music for his band and other content creators.

Aside from endlessly window shopping and watching hours of gear reviews for leisure, he enjoys playing competitive FPS games, MMORPGs and caring for his 5 cats. He is primarily influenced by guitarists like Kurt Ballou and Paul Gilbert. His favorite pieces of gear are his Ibanez RG550RFR, Orange Brent Hinds Terror amplifier and EQD Acapulco Gold fuzz.

Contributors

Alexander Briones: Supplemental writing.
Jason Horton: Editing and Illustrating.

Media

Main/Top Image: based on a stock photograph in the public domain.

The individual product images, frequency response charts and polar pattern charts were sourced from their respective manufacturers' websites, promotional materials or supporting documentation.

Comments

So the Akg p220 condenser mic

So the Akg p220 condenser mic can work well in accompanied with what type of mixer and interface?

I'm looking for a Mic plus pa

I'm looking for a Mic plus pa system that will give me a quality sound over a screaming audience without me having to scream into the Mic, and or make adjustments in the middle of a song. While at the sametime picking up the sound from an acoustic guitar. I'm not trying to ruin my vocal cords while singing any type of song. I'm open to suggestions.

the best way learn to sing

the best way learn to sing properly, really. Unless you specifically go there for the quietness (like billie eilish, etc. do nowadays) you should be able to sing loud enough to be louder than any normal crowd, if your singing technique is correct. In fact, singing quietly is a sign of a person not using their lungs and head properly. Singing louder is not about vocal chords at all, but about the resonance of your body, the vocal chords actually play a minor part in the loudness of the sound. If you feel like singing louder makes your vocal chords soar, please, find a vocal couch. It is really dangerous to sing in a vocal-chords-heavy way, even if you sing just a bit louder than just quiet.

If you want me to recomed a mic however, i would go for the shure sm58 for vocals, and a guitar with a pickup. I cannot recommend any more versatile mic, while not knowing how your voice sounds. About the PA, if you are on the budget, i would just recommend any small mixer, and like an RCA, or any half-way decent monitor.

But seriously, make sure your breathing technique is correct, and that you do not overuse your vocal chords. It might me dangerous, and might affect your voice in the future.

i hope this helps... ale the best!

If you're singing and playing

While you can mic an acoustic guitar on stage, it requires more effort to setup. It is also harder to stop noise from bleeding into acoustic guitar mics. This is why miking acoustic guitars are mostly done in recording studios, or intimate/small venue performances.

If you're singing and playing guitar at the same time over a noisy crowd, then you're best option is to have a good acoustic electric guitar that can be plugged in straight to PA, and have a dedicated stage mic for vocals. You can click the links to see our recommendations, based on market response.

Since you mentioned you're looking for a PA system, you can check out our Portable PA System recommendations.

Post a Comment or Question

Filtered HTML

  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <a> <em> <strong> <b> <cite> <blockquote> <code> <ul> <ol> <li> <dl> <dt> <dd>
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.